Graffiti depicting India’s diversity, culture unveiled in central Delhi

first_imgNew Delhi, Jun 16 (PTI) A graffiti depicting India’s diversity was unveiled at Barakhamba Road in central Delhi today as part of a multi-city initiative to celebrate the country’s art, culture, sports and unity.An on-ground carnival with food, music street plays and other entertainment activities was also held at the venue.Actor Dia Mirza participated in the event organised by Radio Mirchi and Canara HSBC Oriental Bank of Commerce Life Insurance, according to a statement from the organisers.”I’m very thrilled to be here – as part of a campaign that believes in clean and beautiful cities. “I believe that as a society and as citizens of this country, we all have a responsibility towards our nation and creating an atmosphere of cleanliness and beauty for everyone,” the statement quoted Mirza as saying.The initiative aims to celebrate India’s art, culture, unity and diversity, India’s sports achievements through graffiti.It is being launched in Delhi and will travel to Mumbai, Bengaluru, Chennai, Trivandrum, Chandigarh, Kolkata, Pune, Hyderabad, and Ahmedabad this year, the statement said.The idea behind the initiative is to bring out the idea of everyone standing up for their city and taking pride in it, the statement added. PTI BUN BUN ABHABHlast_img read more

Seven-Year Secondary-School Programme a Game Changer – Dr. McLean

first_imgStory Highlights She noted that, traditionally, secondary students who move into grades 12 and 13 are required to do the Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE) and earn four units for each of the two respective grades.She said that the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) is reconfiguring the units at grades 12 and 13 to enable students to attain at least 60 credits as specified by the University Council of Jamaica (UCJ) in order to earn that associate degree.“So, that is a decision that has been taken and developed by the Caribbean Examinations Council. So all students that are doing CAPE can now have the opportunity to leave with an associate degree, which is two years of college education,” Dr. McLean stressed.The NCE/NCEL training programme was designed to equip principals and Board chairs with the skills needed to effectively influence and guide the strategic direction of their respective schools; increase awareness of the legal and regulatory framework governing public educational institutions; and empower school Boards to effectively interrogate and navigate the various issues.Public Relations Officer of the National College for Education Leadership (NCEL), Toni-Ann Rankine, presents one of the new handbooks for school Boards to Chairman of Greater Portmore Primary School, Troy Bygrave. Occasion was the NCEL/National Council on Education (NCE) training workshop for principals and Board chairs, held at the Melia Braco Village in Trelawny on Monday, March 12. Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, Dr. Grace McLean, says the introduction of a full seven-year secondary school programme “is a serious game changer for education in Jamaica”. “What it means is that every single child, whether they are at the lowest level or the highest level, the kind of instruction that is being provided will allow them to be brought up to the required level, so that they can at least leave with an associate degree,” she noted. Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, Dr. Grace McLean, says the introduction of a full seven-year secondary school programme “is a serious game changer for education in Jamaica”.She explained that the programme grants sixth-form students the opportunity to leave grade 13 with an associate degree and enables them to move into a tertiary institution to complete their bachelor’s degree in another two years.“What it means is that every single child, whether they are at the lowest level or the highest level, the kind of instruction that is being provided will allow them to be brought up to the required level, so that they can at least leave with an associate degree,” she noted.Dr. McLean was addressing the National College for Education Leadership (NCEL)/National Council on Education (NCE) training workshop for principals and Board chairs held at the Melia Braco Village in Trelawny on Monday (March 12).Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, Dr. Grace McLean, reads from the new handbook for school Boards while addressing a training workshop for principals and Board chairs hosted by the National College for Education Leadership (NCEL)/National Council on Education (NCE) at the Melia Braco Village in Trelawny on Monday (March 12). She explained that the programme grants sixth-form students the opportunity to leave grade 13 with an associate degree and enables them to move into a tertiary institution to complete their bachelor’s degree in another two years. New handbooks for school Boards were also distributed to those in attendance.last_img read more

Malala Yousafzai Helps UN Celebrate In San Francisco

first_imgBringing the idea of the United Nations to life required huge leaps of statecraft to bridge differences, declared Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Friday in San Francisco, commemorating the 70th anniversary of the adoption of the UN Charter, which he said “symbolizes the hope and aspirations that we can bring the world as it is a little closer to the world as it should be.”Ban Ki-moon addresses a ceremony commemorating the 70th anniversary of the adoption of the UN Charter in San FranciscoCredit/Copyright: UN Photo/Mark Garten“In signing this document, the founders achieved what many thought impossible. It falls to us to heed the Charter’s call to ‘unite our strength’ and to use their creation – the United Nations – for the common good,” he said, adding that the drafting of the Charter was a “glorious gamble.”Several high-level officials attended the ceremony, including; Nancy Pelosi, Congresswoman and Democratic Leader of the United States House of Representatives; Jerry Brown, Governor of California; Edwin Lee, Mayor of San Francisco; and Malala Yousafzai, Nobel Peace Prize laureate, whom the UN chief called the “torchbearer” of her generation.“So much faith was lost in the trenches and gas chambers of two world wars in the space of one generation. But they dared to believe in something bigger than person or country. Through intense negotiations, the delegates realized their dream.”He said that for two months, they turned San Francisco’s War Memorial into a ‘Peace Palace.’ More than three thousand women and men took part. One of them was Ellen Magnin Newman, a high school senior at the time. She was a Spanish interpreter – and helped everyone speak the universal language of peace, he said welcoming Ms. Newman to the ceremony.With the adoption of the Charter, a world in rubble found a path to renewal, the Secretary-General went on to say, recalling that while he had been born just months before the UN, it did not take long for the Organization to change his world for good.“When the Korean War ravaged my country, I lost my home, my school, all I knew. Help came bearing the United Nations flag: sacks of grain from UNICEF, textbooks from UNESCO, and many young soldiers from 21 nations, including the United States. The United Nations showed us we were not alone,” said Mr. Ban.“Today, when I travel to refugee camps and conflict areas around the world, I tell young people: you are not alone. I made it. You can, too. The United Nations will stand with you,” said the UN chief, underscoring that every day, the UN feeds the hungry, shelters refugees and vaccinates children against deadly disease.“Every day, we defend human rights for all, regardless of race, religion, nationality, gender or sexual orientation,” and in that regard, he welcomed the decision of the Supreme Court of the United States that paves the way for gay and lesbian Americans to have their relationship legally recognised, no matter which part of the United States they are living in.Continuing, he said the United Nations had led the charge in dismantling colonialism, bringing freedom to millions. It had mobilized the world to defeat apartheid. Its peacekeepers are on the frontlines of war; our mediators bring warriors to the table of peace.“Yet tragedy has also been with us every step of the way. Genocide, war and a thousand daily indignities and abuse plague far too many people, especially women’” he said, explaining that conflict has forced more people to flee their homes today than at any time since the Second World War.“Forces of division are on the march, peddling the false promise of isolation in ever more interdependent world. And the planet itself is at risk,” he said, declaring: “We have big work ahead.”To that end, he noted that in September, world leaders will adopt an inspiring new development agenda to end global poverty. In December, the international community has committed to reach a bold climate change agreement to place the world on more sustainable footing.“These are once-in-a-generation opportunities. This is our San Francisco moment,” he said, stressing that in signing the Charter, the founders achieved what many thought impossible. The United Nations is the hope and home of all humankind. The Charter is our compass. Let us never relent on the journey to a better world for ‘we the peoples,’” concluded the Secretary-General.At an event in New York to mark the anniversary, Deputy Secretary-general Jan Eliasson said the UN Charter is essentially an expression of hope. It was written at the end of one of the darkest chapters in human history. “It symbolises the hope and aspirations that we can bring the world as it is a little closer to the world as it should be. This we can do through cooperation, dialogue, peaceful settlement of disputes and respect of human rights.”“Yes, the UN Charter is truly a gift. It reminds us – as the present stewards of the United Nations – of our responsibilities to live up to the Purposes and Principles of the Charter. It connects us to our strongest roots and our best aspirations as we reach out to an uncertain, yet hopeful, future – if we travel the right road, Mr. Eliasson said.Also addressing the ceremony, Einar Gunnarsson, Vice-President of the General Assembly, speaking on behalf of Assembly President Sam Kutesa, said that over the course of 70 eventful years, the UN has addressed severe global problems that afflict and challenge humanity’s stability and progress.The contributions of the UN to the contemporary issues of our time are undeniable. From supporting the major decolonization efforts across Africa and Asia to providing a critical platform for discourse throughout the Cold War; the United Nations has, and continues to be, at the forefront of efforts to ensure a secure, prosperous and equitable world.“As we mark this historic anniversary, we have every reason to celebrate all that we have accomplished as a community of nations over the last seven decades. We also need to reflect on how to adapt and align the United Nations to remain effective and relevant in a dynamic and globalized new world,” he said.Source:United Nationslast_img read more

Athabasca Chipewyan the tar sands are making us sick

first_imgAPTN InFocus with Cheryl McKenzie:In October leaders, Elders, members and supporters of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation (ACFN) rallied at the Federal Court in Vancouver.Today, they’re waiting for the court’s response on a judicial review.They want federal Environment Minister Leona Aglukkaq’s decision to allow expansion of the Alberta tar sands, quashed.In addition to ACFN’s argument that their section 35 Constitutional rights were violated in the process, they also have results of an environmental health study on their side.The study links contaminants from the tar sands to incidence of illness in their community.Video courtesy: One River News (onerivernews.ca)last_img

Jeff Lynnes ELO Announce 2018 US Tour Dates

first_img Email Facebook Jeff Lynne’s ELO Announce 2018 U.S. Tour Dates News Jeff Lynne’s ELO Set 2018 U.S. Tour Dates jeff-lynnes-elo-announce-2018-us-tour-dates Twitter GRAMMY winner and his Electric Light Orchestra to tour United States for first time since 1981Tim McPhateGRAMMYs Nov 13, 2017 – 7:50 am Jeff Lynne and his Electric Light Orchestra will make a concert comeback in the United States for the first time in 37 years in 2018.The “Mr. Blue Sky” collective will kick off their first U.S. trek since 1981 on Aug. 2, 2018, at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif.. The three-week jaunt will wrap Aug. 24 in Philadelphia at Wells Fargo Center.”Our audiences are amazing. It’s like they’re in the group,” said the GRAMMY winner Lynne in a statement. “We can’t wait to play for them again.”Tickets for the 2018 U.S. tour will go on sale Nov. 17 via Ticketmaster.Meanwhile, those looking for something to tide them over can indulge in ELO’s Wembley Or Bust live concert film/album, which drops Nov. 17. The GRAMMY Museum at L.A. Live will host a special screening of the film on Nov. 16.How Much Did Tom Petty’s Final Concert Tour Earn?Read morelast_img read more

Book depicting Farhan as Milkha not part of Bengal school curriculum

first_imgKolkata: After filmmaker-actor-singer Farhan Akhtar pointed out a “glaring error” made in a West Bengal school book which depicted him as legendary athlete Milkha Singh, Trinamool Congress MP Derek O’Brien on Monday said the book was not part of government schools’ curriculum. “Thanks Farhan. Ref the wrong pic of Milkha Singh. Checked with education minister of state. He tells me it isn’t a textbook for government schools. Nor is it published by government,” he said in a tweet. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life “Trying to track the private publishing company. They ought to correct the mistake in future editions,” the MP added. Farhan, who played the title role in the Indian track and field legend Milkha Singh’s biopic “Bhaag Milkha Bhaag”, replied: “Appreciate your response. Tagged you since you take education very seriously.” On Sunday, Farhan had tweeted, “To the Minister of School Education, West Bengal. There is a glaring error with the image used in one of the school text books to depict Milkha Singhji. Could you please request the publisher to recall and replace this book? Sincerely”. Among his many achievements, Mikha Singh was the first Indian to clinch an individual athletics gold medal at the Commonwealth Games in 1958.last_img read more