Ford EcoSPort deliveries to begin from November in India

first_imgFord Ecosport will be launching the facelifted EcoSport compact SUV on November 9, 2017. The deliveries are also slated to begin from November. The vehicle will be taking on the likes of Maruti Vitara Brezza and the Tata Nexon. The EcoSport is a sub-4 meter model which means that it will qualify for excise duty benefits. Ford will also launch a sporty variant, called the EcoSport S. It will be India’s first sporty compact SUV.The upcoming SUV now sports exterior changes, with the vehicle now possessing a stronger and aggressive stance that the previous model. The SUV will be getting the Ford’s signature hexagonal griller which is wider and more prominent that the model before. The headlamps are new, so are the bumpers which get a tough aggressive stance.Furthermore, the vehicle gets black cladding which gives good optimum contrast and gives the SUV a more wider stance. The looks have not changed much at the rear but the interiors have been renovated with a center console, a touch-screen infotainment system with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, new steering wheel, and a instrument cluster.The engine is new as Ford is bringing out a naturally petrol engine on the EcoSport from the Dragon range of engines. The engine is a 1.5-litre 3-cylinder engine which produces 125bhp and 150Nm. This engine is tipped to be offered with a 5-speed manual and 6-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox.The 1.5 liter TDCI turbocharged diesel engine will be the other option. This engine produces 98.6 Bhp and 205 Nm, and will be mated to a 5 speed manual gearbox. Another engine that could be carried over from the pre-facelift model is the 1 liter EcoBoost engine.advertisementThis petrol motor is turbocharged and churns out an astounding 125 Bhp and 170 Nm. This engine will make the EcoSport the most powerful petrol compact SUV in the segment. The engine however comes mated to a 5-speed manual which is already provided in India.last_img read more

USCG Texas LNGs Marine Traffic Suitable for Brownsville

first_imgzoom The United States Coast Guard has affirmed the suitability of the Brownsville Ship Channel for Texas LNG’s marine traffic.In a Letter of Recommendation issued to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the USCG Captain R.A. Hahn, Captain of the Port, Corpus Christi, Texas, said that the Brownsville Ship Channel is considered as suitable for “accommodating the type and frequency of LNG marine traffic associated with this project.”The Letter of Recommendation was issued after the USCG reviewed the information in the applicant’s Letter of Intent and Waterway Suitability Assessment and completed an evaluation of the waterway in consultation with a variety of state and local port stakeholders.In its review of Texas LNG’s Water Suitabilitity Assessment, the Coast Guard addressed public comments that raised a number of issues, including safety, security, potential environmental impacts, economics, public outreach, and physical characteritics of the ship channel.In addition, the Coast Guard considered not only Texas LNG’s expected LNG carrier traffic, but also recognized other traffic transiting through the channel including offshore rigs, aircraft carriers, fishing vessels, recreational vessels, towing vessels, non-piloted barges, as well as potential traffic from other proposed LNG projects.The Coast Guard concluded that the waterway is suitable to handle current and anticipated incremental traffic from the Texas LNG facility.The Texas LNG facility is being designed to accommodate LNG carriers with nominal LNG capacities up to 180,000 m3 and dimensions on the order of 977-feet long and 151-feet wide. The Brownsville Ship Channel has a current depth of 42 feet, with full U.S. Congressional authorization to deepen its channel to 52 feet.The total inbound transit from the Gulf of Mexico sea buoy (pilot boarding area) to the future Texas LNG terminal berth is approximately seven miles (11 km). This is a notable advantage over most other proposed US LNG projects in Texas, as well those in Louisiana, where transit distances can be significantly longer.Full FERC approval and Final Investment Decision (FID) for the development of the Texas LNG liquefaction project in Brownsville, Texas, are expected in 2019, and first phase production of 2 million tonnes per annum of LNG is expected to begin in 2023.last_img read more

Man dies after being pulled from water by rescuers near Ballard Locks

first_imgA man died Sunday after being pulled from the waters of Salmon Bay near Ballard, the Seattle Fire Department said.At 4:35 p.m., Seattle Police Harbor Patrol responded to a call about a man who was missing at Lockhaven Marina, according to Seattle Fire spokeswoman Kristin Tinsley. Divers pulled out the man, who was about 55 years old, shortly after. Rescuers attempted lifesaving efforts on the man for more than 20 minutes, but the attempts were unsuccessful, she said.The man was exercising his two dogs at Lockhaven Marina when the incident occurred, Tinsley said. It was unclear immediately how the man ended up in the water, though foul play is not suspected, she added.One of the man’s dogs also died Sunday.The man owned a boat moored at the marina, which is near the Ballard Locks, Tinsley said. People accompanying the man before he left for the marina called authorities Sunday afternoon, saying they were concerned that he might be missing. He had been gone for about an hour and a half at that time, she said.Divers found the man in the water near his boat, and pulled him aboard the boat to attempt to save his life. The water is about 17 feet deep at that part of the marina.last_img read more

Tech Startups Are Prodding the Dinosaur That Is the Insurance Industry

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. October 21, 2015 Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Here’s a sentence you don’t read every day: Insurance is so hot right now.Entrepreneurs and investors have finally woken up to the opportunity in the insurance industry. At $831.5 million, investment in insurance tech this year is already up nearly 10 times what it was in 2010.The opportunity has been staring entrepreneurs and investors in the face for years. The first insurance companies in the U.S. were started in the 1700s, and that cottage industry has grown into one of the biggest markets and sources of capital in the world. Premiums in the U.S. insurance industry total around $1 trillion, or approximately 7 percent of gross domestic product. On top of that, insurance companies invest nearly $7 trillion in assets.And here’s the kicker about all that insurance money — it’s generated by millions of agents, with lots of paper, in processes that look much the same way they did 30 years ago.Related: Investors Are Poised to Disrupt the Tech-Averse Insurance IndustryIn my previous life as a McKinsey consultant, I advised the top insurance companies on projects that were, at their core, incremental. They were always about increasing the productivity of the agent-based sales force, or improving the efficiency of paper-based claims operations. In other words, what I was doing was putting the dinosaur on a diet and prodding it with a stick. What needed to be done was bring a whole new breed of animal into the insurance game.So I left McKinsey in 2013 to do just that and started a digital consumer insurance company, PolicyGenius. At PolicyGenius, we want to do for consumer insurance what TurboTax did for taxes: Make a complex and intimidating financial task easy enough to do it yourself online.While raising seed capital for my insurance tech company last year, the most common question I got from prospective investors was, “Why is now the right time for tech to disrupt insurance?” The obvious answer for those unfamiliar with the insurance industry is the Affordable Care Act, which was signed into law in 2010. The law created exactly the kind of macro shakeup that attracts entrepreneurs. Indeed, since 2010, 56 percent of all insurance tech startups are focused on health insurance, either delivering new employer brokerage models (Liazon, Zenefits, Benefitter), new consumer brokerage models (Gravie, Stride Health) or even new health insurance (Oscar). These startups are pushing the brick-and-mortar incumbents to deliver better services and providing much-needed options to consumers.Beyond the Affordable Care Act, there are other forces at work that have opened the floodgates, allowing creative entrepreneurs to reshape the insurance industry more broadly. These are the market disruptions I see:1. The end of an eraAmericans used to rely on their employers for retirement security. After 20 years of service, you’d get a gold watch and a pension to fund your sunset years. Then, in the 1980s, growing pension costs and a legislative change replaced the corporate pension with the 401(k) and gave rise to the modern retail investment and retirement industry.That shift — from employer to consumer responsibility — is exactly what’s about to happen to insurance. Employer-sponsored insurance is the legacy of an IRS ruling after World War II that allowed employers to deduct employee health insurance as a business expense and employees to receive that benefit as nontaxable income. Sixty years later, we have a sprawling and bloated system, where the extra employer layer adds billions of dollars of cost and empowers employers to make intrusive decisions about their employees’ healthcare. Add to that, the cost of health insurance premiums growing at four times inflation and workers changing employers far more often than they did 60 years ago, and you have a system that’s going to break.The cracks are already showing. The number of workers at small and medium-sized companies who get employer-sponsored health insurance has steadily declined since 2000. The CEO of Aetna has called for the creative destruction of healthcare and taking the employer out of the health insurance equation. Startups that can effectively step into that employer insurance void, the same way companies like Fidelity and Schwab stepped into the employer pension void, will enjoy a massive opportunity.Related: 3 Benefits of the Affordable Care Act Every Business Leader Needs to Know About2. A changing workforceIt’s no secret that the workforce is rapidly changing. The average worker changes employers every 4.6 years. And, more disruptively for insurance, more workers are finding themselves outside the typical employer relationship. Spurred by on-demand services like Uber and countless “Uber for X” startups, freelancers and independent contractors are projected to grow from 42 million people to 65 million in the next 5 years.These workers need individual insurance (like health, disability and life) and business insurance (liability and property). Insurance companies, and the traditional insurance agent model, are ill-suited to serve the self-employed and provide them with the advice and products they need to financially protect themselves and their families.Ask 100 freelancers how they navigate the insurance maze and they’ll all say same thing — with tremendous difficulty. Easing that difficulty for them represents a tremendous opportunity.3. An aging sales forceMost insurance in the U.S. is still sold by human agents, same as it’s always been. But it won’t be for long. The average age of an insurance agent in the U.S. is 59, and one-fourth of the industry’s workforce is expected to retire by 2018. In other words, insurance companies are standing on a burning platform. And they’re already starting to feel the heat.For example, life insurance ownership is at a 50-year low, not because the need has changed — in fact there’s a $20 trillion life insurance gap, but because the agent sales channel can’t reach the modern financial consumer. To their credit, insurance companies realize this reality, but the fact of the matter is that they can’t move as fast as startups can. So they’re investing in startups.  Insurance companies have dramatically increased their direct investments in tech startups to the tune of $1.8 billion since 2010. Much of this investment has gone to the first waves of financial technology: lending (Prosper) and wealth management (Learnvest, Betterment). But talk to any insurance company directly investing in startups, and you’ll learn that they’re hammers in search of nails, that is, smart entrepreneurs tackling the fundamental problems in insurance.4. Unmet needFinally, and most importantly for a mission-driven company, there is a tremendous unmet need for insurance in the U.S. According to a recent survey by the Federal Reserve, 47 percent of households couldn’t cover an emergency expense of $400. Insurance is intended to fill in this savings void for unpredictable emergencies. However, too many Americans have low savings and inadequate insurance, which leads to financial disaster. For example, health problems and disability contributed to half of all home foreclosure filings and over 60 percent of all personal bankruptcy filings. It’s not easy or sexy to sell insurance to middle America, but it’s an important problem to solve — and the first company to do it will be huge.These are the tailwinds that made me excited about insurance tech two years ago and which continue to drive my company forward. We recently closed a $5.3 million Series A round, which included the participation of insurance companies’ venture arms, including AXA Strategic Ventures and Transamerica Ventures. We, and our insurance partners, are excited to make insurance the next big thing in tech.Related: The 25 Best Companies for Employee Compensation and Benefits Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Register Now » 7 min readlast_img read more

The Worlds First Robot Police Officer Just Debuted in Dubai

first_img Enroll Now for Free Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now 2 min read May 22, 2017center_img This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. From fast food cooks to concierges at restaurants and hotels, robots are slowly infiltrating the workforce in nearly every industry. Most recently, the world welcomed its first operational robot policeman.“Robocop,” the newest member of the Dubai police force, debuted on May 22 at the Fourth Gulf Information Security Expo and Conference, where it greeted guests.Related: These 5 Robotics Startups Are Changing The Way Work Gets DoneAt approximately 70 inches tall and weighing nearly 220 pounds, Robocop seeks to engage with city residents and tourists. Featuring an “emotion detector,” the robot can recognize a person’s gestures and body language from nearly five feet away. Robocop’s skills don’t stop there — the emotionally intelligent bot can detect if a person is happy, sad and even angry by studying his or her facial expression. And just like your human friends would do, if Robocop sees you’re unhappy, it will try to lift your spirits.  More importantly, when it comes to fighting crime, the robot uses the internet of things, artificial intelligence and other smart technologies to spot offenders using facial recognition. Its navigation skills grant it the ability to map out areas and travel on its own.Related: These Absolutely Frightening Robots Will Give You NightmaresEquipped with a built-in tablet, Robocop can communicate with people, speak six languages, respond to public queries, shake hands and even military salute.”With an aim to assist and help people in the malls or on the streets,” said Brigadier-General Khalid Nasser Al Razzouqi, director-general of smart services at Dubai Police, “the Robocop is the latest smart addition to the force and has been designed to help us fight crime, keep the city safe and improve happiness levels.”last_img read more