Donegal’s life saving blood donors receive IBTS awards – Picture Special

first_imgBlood donors from across Donegal were recognised for their impressive gift to others last Friday at the Irish Blood Transfusion Service Donor Awards.A ceremony was held in the Radisson Blu Hotel Letterkenny to honour the remarkable people who have achieved a milestone of blood donations. Some donors had given blood 50 times, while others had made 100 contributions.Linda Hickey, Chairperson of the Board of the IBTS thanked the donors for their dedication on behalf of all patients. She presented Gold Pins to those who have made 50 donations and Porcelain Pelicans for 100-time donors. The Donor Awards Dinner was a chance for the organisation to thank donors for the enormous contribution they give to the health service, which needs 3,000 donors every week, and to inspire more people to become regular donors.One in four people will need a blood transfusion at some point in their lives. However, just three per cent of those who are eligible to donate blood will volunteer to do so.It takes many years and many visits to transfusion clinics to build up 50 and 100 donations, so Friday’s awards was a proud moment for many generous local donors and their families.See photos below, by Clive Wasson Photography: Donors Ivan Farrell and Fergal McAllister from Donegal Town with Linda Hickey, IBTS Chairperson (Irish Blood Transfusion Service). Ivan, a 100 unit donor, brought Fergal along to donate his first unit and Fergal has now donated 50 units. Photo Clive WassonCousins, Damien Friel and Brian Gallagher from Raphoe with Linda Hickey, Chairperson (Irish Blood Transfusion Service) IBTS who received Gold Pins for 50 donations and Porcelain Pelicans for 100 donations in the Radisson Hotel Letterkenny on Friday night last. Photo Clive WassonDonors from the Letterkenny Area with Linda Hickey, Chairperson (Irish Blood Transfusion Service) IBTS, who received Gold Pins for 50 donations and Porcelain Pelicans for 100 donations in the Radisson Hotel Letterkenny on Friday night last. Photo Clive WassonDonors from the Ballyshannon Area with Linda Hickey, Chairperson (Irish Blood Transfusion Service) IBTS who received Gold Pins for 50 donations and Porcelain Pelicans for 100 donations. Front from left are Virginia Loughlin, Linda Hickey, Chairperson IBTS and Caroline Lally. Back from left Frances Hersey and Seamus McPhelim. Photo Clive WassonDonors from the Carndonagh Area with Linda Hickey, Chairperson (Irish Blood Transfusion Service) IBTS who received Gold Pins for 50 donations and Porcelain Pelicans for 100 donations. Front from left are Mary Gillen, Linda Hickey, Chairperson IBTS and Bernadette Skinnader. Back from left Laurence Doherty, Chris Friel, Barry Doherty and Philip Hirrell. Photo Clive WassonDonors from the Killybegs Area with Linda Hickey, Chairperson (Irish Blood Transfusion Service) IBTS who received Gold Pins for 50 donations and Porcelain Pelicans for 100 donations. Front from left are Margaret Cunningham, Linda Hickey, Chairperson IBTS and Peter Connachton. Back from left Andrew Doherty, Niall Bourke and Sean Haughey. Photo Clive WassonDonors from the Buncrana Area with Linda Hickey, Chairperson (Irish Blood Transfusion Service) IBTS who received Gold Pins for 50 donations and Porcelain Pelicans for 100 donations. Front from left are Phyllis Carter, Linda Hickey, Chairperson IBTS and Rosaleen McLaughlin. Back from left Elizabeth Doherty, John Harkin and Eileen McLaughlin. Photo Clive WassonDonors from the Dungloe Area with Linda Hickey, Chairperson (Irish Blood Transfusion Service). From left are Donna Joyce, Eoin Coyle and Bridie McCole. Photo Clive WassonDonors from the Ballybofey Area with Linda Hickey, Chairperson (Irish Blood Transfusion Service) IBTS who received Gold Pins for 50 donations and Porcelain Pelicans for 100 donations in the Radisson Hotel Letterkenny on Friday night last. Photo Clive WassonDonor Willie Cassey from Leitrm with Linda Hickey, Chairperson (Irish Blood Transfusion Service) IBTS . Photo Clive WassonDonors from the Donegal Town Area with Linda Hickey, Chairperson (Irish Blood Transfusion Service) IBTS who received Gold Pins for 50 donations and Porcelain Pelicans for 100 donations in the Radisson Hotel Letterkenny on Friday night last. Photo Clive WassonDonegal’s life saving blood donors receive IBTS awards – Picture Special was last modified: April 9th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:blood donationsdonor awardseventsirish blood transfusion servicelast_img read more

Umtata Christian School celebrates Global Dignity Day

first_imgUmtata Christian School pupils with their Global Dignity Day certificates.Prelene SinghOn Wednesday 15 October young South Africans celebrated Global Dignity Day. The day aims to promote the importance of dignity and teach how to help others lead a dignified life. On the day, thousands of volunteers across the world worked to instil a new, positive, inclusive and interconnected sense of value in young people that will guide them as they grow to adulthood.What is Global Dignity?“Dignity is the source of human rights.” This was a key realisation for Vuyo Jack, one of the founders of the Global Dignity Club, a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader, selected in 2009. Jack was intrigued by the Global Day initiative, co-founded by a group of his fellow Young Global Leaders, Prince Haakon, the crown Prince of Norway, John Hope Bryant and Prof Pekka Himanen.The initiative was inspired by Prince Haakon’s visit to South Africa in the early days of democracy, where he experienced the importance of dignity in people’s lives. “We wanted to build on this inspiration by extending Global Dignity Day celebrations to many people through a summit in 2010 which was attended by young professionals from and around South Africa,” says Jack.This journey took them around the country covering the nine provinces with a goal of engaging learners from different backgrounds. This compelled them to conceptualise a more sustainable programme for learners where they could engage and take action on matters relating to dignity in their environment, proactively, on a daily basis. This is how the Global Dignity Club programme was established in January 2013.Brand South Africa then joined forces with the Global Dignity movement through the Play Your Part programme. The campaign is aimed at preparing students for their journey towards cultivating the ability to empathise with others and to instil in them the recognition that every life has equal value.The focus is on accelerating the execution of the National Development Plan (NDP) by taking a community-centric approach to the socioeconomic, academic and entrepreneurial development of learners.The South African Dignity campaign has since reached more than 15 000 school learners in nine provinces across the country. The message of dignity is centred on education, financial literacy and the values of ubuntu. Ubuntu is largely understood as an expression of kindness to the vulnerable other. It’s a phenomenon that has less to do with social vulnerability but more about social assertiveness. The concept speaks to the ability of one to claim what is rightfully theirs in relation to the other.The Umtata Christian SchoolLast year, when the campaign was launched, the Umtata Christian School in the Eastern Cape came up with the idea to start a soup kitchen, a drama club and career expos – on a budget of only R2 000 – as part of their contribution to Global Dignity Day.The soup kitchen helps feed homeless people in the area as a way to restore their dignity. The drama club is set to teach performing arts skills to the school’s pupils while simultaneously spreading the message of dignity. With the careers expo, the club adopted three schools in the rural area of Tsolo on the outskirts of Mthatha, with the intention to guide underprivileged learners in career choices and self-introspection that goes into choosing a career.As part of Global Dignity Day celebrations, the learners of Umtata Christian School applied their minds to an integrated programme, performing a play, reflecting on the year by showing videos of the community work they had done throughout the year, such as donating old clothes to the unfortunate and painting a day care centre. They also created a space for participation from the audience by allowing speakers to talk to what dignity means in various spaces, such a spiritual environment and how dignity applies to relationships, as a way to propagate the gospel of dignity to members of their community and the learners.Play Your PartThese smaller community initiatives are entirely developed by learners of the club and executed with help from their mentors and teachers. This lays the foundation early on in their education and the value of active citizenship. They are taught to inspire new ways to make a fundamental change in their respective communities. By such activities which are made appealing to youngsters, they are able to display initiative and leadership abilities, which will be key to realising the development goals outlined in the NDP and Vision 2030.In partnership with the Global Dignity Club, Brand South Africa handed out certificates to all the learners of the Club, as a way to encourage them to continue playing their part in their communities and grow to be active citizens of the country. After all, today’s youth will make up the workforce of 2030, so their input and involvement is crucial.last_img read more

Neb. Livestock Disaster Losses Mounting

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Todd NeeleyDTN Staff ReporterOMAHA (DTN) — As flood waters continue to recede in the east and the dig out continues from a recent blizzard in the west, the agriculture tally from the worst disaster in Nebraska’s history may go on for months to come.The state’s Agriculture Director Steve Wellman told reporters on Monday evening that early estimates are the hit to the state’s livestock sector may be in the hundreds of millions of dollars.“We’re looking at a $400 million impact to livestock — mostly beef,” he said, “and with spring planting there will be delays. It’s hard to know what it really amounts to. As for a number of acres, we haven’t tried to do.”At the peak of the flooding, Nebraska Department of Transportation Director Kyle Schneweis said there were 79 highways closed accounting for 1,568 miles.As of Monday, that number and been whittled down to about 540 miles. In addition, there wasn’t a single flood rescue request in the state on Monday after a several-day total of 163.Nebraska Emergency Management Agency Assistant Director Bryan Tuma said the state has filed a request for an expedited federal disaster declaration.“This event has been overwhelming,” he said. “We have little doubt that we qualify.”Tuma said state officials will meet with Federal Emergency Management Agency officials in Kansas City on Tuesday, to discuss the state’s expedited application for both public and individual federal disaster assistance. This is just the second time in the state’s history it has applied for individual assistance, the first being in 2011 with the Missouri River flooding.The hope is the request will move quickly to President Donald Trump’s desk for a signature. Tuma said once approved, the state will begin a full assessment of the damage.“We’ve never had an event like this in the history of our state,” Tuma said.Though floodwaters are receding in northeast Nebraska, flooding from the Missouri River already has reached 2011 levels in the southeastern tip of the state.Nebraska State Patrol Colonel John Bolduc said as a result of Interstate 29 closing in southwest Iowa and northwest Missouri, Nebraska Highway 75 in the Nebraska City area is taking the brunt of truck traffic.In the Plattsmouth area, in the state’s southeastern corner, the Missouri River has flooded to a level already exceeding the 2011 disaster.“In Plattsmouth, it took 108 days to drop (in 2011),” Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts said, “and the water there now is higher.”Ricketts said though waters are receding, there still is a lot of work to do.“This is going to take a while,” he said.“Eleven bridges are completely gone. It is going to be a months’-long process. I expect you’ll see Nebraska pulling together. There also will be hundreds of homes damaged and I suspect we’ll be working (to recover) through the course of the year.”HITS TO AGRICULTUREState officials said the state’s agriculture sector is seeing many disruptions as a result of road closures.Wellman said dairies in eastern Nebraska have seen delivery drivers travel 100 to 150 miles out of the way to and from dairies. Many agriculture businesses are finding it difficult to receive supplies to continue operations, he said.At the moment, state officials are focused on flood damage to highways, and have been in contact with county officials about the extent of damage to county roads.Wellman said many of the state’s farmers and ranchers will continue to see travel disruptions on county roads.“It’s extreme,” he said about the damage. “This will be a long-term project to rebuild what’s been damaged.”Based on early assessments, Wellman said detours will cause farming operations to incur an additional $1 million per day in transportation costs statewide.As of Monday, in addition to bridges lost, Schneweis said there is about 200 miles of highways that either require repairs or complete reconstruction.“It will require significant investment,” he said. “We expect the damages statewide to be in the hundreds of millions of dollars. We ask that people stay patient. We are making progress and will need more patience.”Once the flood waters recede, Schneweis said officials will inspect roadways and reopen those deemed to be safe.Getting a handle on the extent of the damage to county roads, however, may take some time.“There are some counties that might have 1,000 miles of county roads to assess,” Schneweis said.As the state begins to add up the damage to roads, he said the rebuilding plans going forward will depend on each individual situation.For example, Nebraska Highway 12 that travels over the Niobrara River in the northern part of the state was completely washed away. Prior to the devastation, the state had been studying the future of Highway 12 that has a history of flooding, Schneweis said.Now that the highway is no more, he said the state will look at perhaps making a significant investment in complete replacement.“The detour up there is an hour long,” Schneweis said.Todd Neeley can be reached at [email protected] him on Twitter @toddneeleyDTN.(ES)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more