Touchline Newsletter – 4th Edition

first_imgThe journal is an excellent resource for affiliates as it investigates the ins and outs of risk management associated with sport by relating to real situations in various sports from all over the world. In the 4th edition of Touchline, Sportscover focus on the issue of Sport and the Law and when the two mix, it provides some fantastic sports anecdotes from around the globe in the ‘Sports Shorts’ section and also provides an interesting piece regarding head injuries among the contact football codes.To view a copy of the journal, please click the link below. http://www.sportscover.com/files/Touchline_edition4.pdflast_img

Jinhui Ends 2018 in Black after Shedding Four Supramaxes

first_imgzoomIllustration; Image Courtesy: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license Jinhui Shipping and Transportation Limited has posted a net profit of USD 8.7 million for 2018, driven by the sale of four Supramax bulkers.As disclosed by the Hong Kong-based shipping company in its financial report for the fourth quarter and full year, the four vessels were sold for a price of USD 32.5 million, bringing in a net gain of USD 5.4 million.While contributing to the net profit for the full year, the reduced number of vessels impacted Jinhui Shipping’s fourth quarter, resulting in a revenue of USD 17.7 million, a 16% drop compared to USD 21.1 million for the same period in 2017.The company reported a consolidated net loss of USD 3.07 million for the fourth quarter of 2018, compared to a net profit of USD 2.47 million for the fourth quarter of 2017.For the full year, Jinhui Shipping reported USD 76,1 million in revenues, 3% more than what it reported for the previous year.The company’s average daily TCE also improved in 2018, rising to USD 9,922 compared to the USD 8,111 in 2017.“We are in a relatively fortunate position where we have no capital expenditure commitment in relation to newbuilding contracts, as well as no charter-in contracts at this juncture,” Ng Siu Fai, Jinhui Shipping Chairman, said.“Looking ahead, we will continue to focus on taking sensible and decisive actions to maintain a strong financial position, to ensure safe navigation through any stormy waters that may lie ahead.”The company currently owns a fleet of 17 Supramax bulkers and 2 Post-Panamax bulkers.last_img read more

Malala Yousafzai Helps UN Celebrate In San Francisco

first_imgBringing the idea of the United Nations to life required huge leaps of statecraft to bridge differences, declared Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Friday in San Francisco, commemorating the 70th anniversary of the adoption of the UN Charter, which he said “symbolizes the hope and aspirations that we can bring the world as it is a little closer to the world as it should be.”Ban Ki-moon addresses a ceremony commemorating the 70th anniversary of the adoption of the UN Charter in San FranciscoCredit/Copyright: UN Photo/Mark Garten“In signing this document, the founders achieved what many thought impossible. It falls to us to heed the Charter’s call to ‘unite our strength’ and to use their creation – the United Nations – for the common good,” he said, adding that the drafting of the Charter was a “glorious gamble.”Several high-level officials attended the ceremony, including; Nancy Pelosi, Congresswoman and Democratic Leader of the United States House of Representatives; Jerry Brown, Governor of California; Edwin Lee, Mayor of San Francisco; and Malala Yousafzai, Nobel Peace Prize laureate, whom the UN chief called the “torchbearer” of her generation.“So much faith was lost in the trenches and gas chambers of two world wars in the space of one generation. But they dared to believe in something bigger than person or country. Through intense negotiations, the delegates realized their dream.”He said that for two months, they turned San Francisco’s War Memorial into a ‘Peace Palace.’ More than three thousand women and men took part. One of them was Ellen Magnin Newman, a high school senior at the time. She was a Spanish interpreter – and helped everyone speak the universal language of peace, he said welcoming Ms. Newman to the ceremony.With the adoption of the Charter, a world in rubble found a path to renewal, the Secretary-General went on to say, recalling that while he had been born just months before the UN, it did not take long for the Organization to change his world for good.“When the Korean War ravaged my country, I lost my home, my school, all I knew. Help came bearing the United Nations flag: sacks of grain from UNICEF, textbooks from UNESCO, and many young soldiers from 21 nations, including the United States. The United Nations showed us we were not alone,” said Mr. Ban.“Today, when I travel to refugee camps and conflict areas around the world, I tell young people: you are not alone. I made it. You can, too. The United Nations will stand with you,” said the UN chief, underscoring that every day, the UN feeds the hungry, shelters refugees and vaccinates children against deadly disease.“Every day, we defend human rights for all, regardless of race, religion, nationality, gender or sexual orientation,” and in that regard, he welcomed the decision of the Supreme Court of the United States that paves the way for gay and lesbian Americans to have their relationship legally recognised, no matter which part of the United States they are living in.Continuing, he said the United Nations had led the charge in dismantling colonialism, bringing freedom to millions. It had mobilized the world to defeat apartheid. Its peacekeepers are on the frontlines of war; our mediators bring warriors to the table of peace.“Yet tragedy has also been with us every step of the way. Genocide, war and a thousand daily indignities and abuse plague far too many people, especially women’” he said, explaining that conflict has forced more people to flee their homes today than at any time since the Second World War.“Forces of division are on the march, peddling the false promise of isolation in ever more interdependent world. And the planet itself is at risk,” he said, declaring: “We have big work ahead.”To that end, he noted that in September, world leaders will adopt an inspiring new development agenda to end global poverty. In December, the international community has committed to reach a bold climate change agreement to place the world on more sustainable footing.“These are once-in-a-generation opportunities. This is our San Francisco moment,” he said, stressing that in signing the Charter, the founders achieved what many thought impossible. The United Nations is the hope and home of all humankind. The Charter is our compass. Let us never relent on the journey to a better world for ‘we the peoples,’” concluded the Secretary-General.At an event in New York to mark the anniversary, Deputy Secretary-general Jan Eliasson said the UN Charter is essentially an expression of hope. It was written at the end of one of the darkest chapters in human history. “It symbolises the hope and aspirations that we can bring the world as it is a little closer to the world as it should be. This we can do through cooperation, dialogue, peaceful settlement of disputes and respect of human rights.”“Yes, the UN Charter is truly a gift. It reminds us – as the present stewards of the United Nations – of our responsibilities to live up to the Purposes and Principles of the Charter. It connects us to our strongest roots and our best aspirations as we reach out to an uncertain, yet hopeful, future – if we travel the right road, Mr. Eliasson said.Also addressing the ceremony, Einar Gunnarsson, Vice-President of the General Assembly, speaking on behalf of Assembly President Sam Kutesa, said that over the course of 70 eventful years, the UN has addressed severe global problems that afflict and challenge humanity’s stability and progress.The contributions of the UN to the contemporary issues of our time are undeniable. From supporting the major decolonization efforts across Africa and Asia to providing a critical platform for discourse throughout the Cold War; the United Nations has, and continues to be, at the forefront of efforts to ensure a secure, prosperous and equitable world.“As we mark this historic anniversary, we have every reason to celebrate all that we have accomplished as a community of nations over the last seven decades. We also need to reflect on how to adapt and align the United Nations to remain effective and relevant in a dynamic and globalized new world,” he said.Source:United Nationslast_img read more

A day in the life of Ohio State guard William Buford

You might know that William Buford is the starting guard for the No. 1-ranked Ohio State basketball team, but you might not know that he is a quiet student, a below average ping-pong player, loves the kids’ meal at Raising Canes and his car could use a trip to the shop. Buford arrived at Central Classroom Building at 10:32 a.m. Monday. He walked briskly up the stairs on the right to get to his 10:30 a.m. class, Swahili 102. Even though he arrived a few minutes after the bell, students were still settling in and Buford found his seat in the middle of the room without causing a disruption. He is not the only recognizable athlete in the class, as football players Jaamal Berry, Mike Adams and Michael Brewster were also in attendance. Buford talked with Berry while the professor distributed a graded quiz. “Most of the athletes, we stay together and try to be close,” Buford said. As the last quiz was handed out and class lecture began, the talking stopped. Buford took notes and did not talk again until the opportunity to work in groups arose. “I’m pretty shy in class. I really don’t say too much,” Buford said. “I try to stay out of the way and get my work done.” As class came to a close, Buford checked with a classmate to make sure he was clear on the assignment for the next class. “Seventy-two sentences?” he said, shocked at the amount of work. With only one class on Mondays and Wednesdays, Buford had finished his academic load for the day. His obligations, however, were far from over. He made the short walk from Central Classrooms to the Tuttle Parking Garage and climbed into his silver 2004 Pontiac Grand Prix, which has been on campus since his sophomore year. The “check engine” light was on as he left the parking garage. Buford drove to Parks Hall and picked up his teammate, senior guard David Lighty. Buford moved to the passenger seat, which was already as far back as the car would allow, and let Lighty drive while he made a call about getting the car serviced. The two starters pulled into the Schottenstein Center parking lot and made their way to the player’s entrance. Buford slowed down and waited for Rob, his barber, who cuts his and Lighty’s hair in the locker room. Rob has been coming to the arena to cut Buford’s hair since the player’s freshman year. With a prime-time game against Purdue to be aired on ESPN the following evening, the timing couldn’t have been better. “I just really needed a haircut since last week, but it worked out that way,” Buford said, smiling. A chair was set up in the bathroom portion of the locker room and Rob opened his bag and went to work. Buford played music on his phone, the EVO, while barber and client rapped along. Buford wandered to the upper bowl of the arena after the 35-minute haircut, in search of an ATM so he could pay Rob. After compensating the barber, he dropped some things off in his locker, which stands between Lighty’s and freshman guard Lenzelle Smith Jr.’s. Buford then retreated to the team’s ping-pong table to pass the time. “Everybody plays,” he said. “We compete a lot at ping-pong.” After 30 more minutes, Lighty’s hair was cut and the two tried to decide where to get food. They agreed on Raising Cane’s and Buford left to pick up the order while Lighty studied. Buford walked into the location on Ackerman Road and ordered a kids’ meal for himself and one for Lighty. “We always get the kids’ meal,” Buford said. “We got practice so we aren’t trying to get too full.” Numerous patrons and employees stared at the basketball player as he placed his order and waited for it to be filled. “I don’t pay attention,” he said of the added attention. “I try not to make eye contact with people.” After returning to the locker room, Buford ate his lunch while watching SportsCenter. At 1:40 p.m., he left the locker room and headed to the training room for treatment on an ankle injury he suffered against Illinois on Jan. 22. With Tuesday’s game looming, Buford needed the ankle treatment in order to play. Under the guidance of team athletic trainer Vince O’Brien, Buford iced his ankle for three different increments of five minutes with stretching exercises in between. After an hour in the training room, Buford returned to the locker room for more ping-pong before the team film session. Strength and conditioning coach Dave Richardson challenged Buford to a game. “I’m about to Forrest Gump his ass,” Buford said. Richardson swapped out the traditional paddle for a small block of wood with an Ohio State emblem on it. “If I beat you with this, you’re not allowed to play anymore,” Richardson said, laughing. Richardson won, 21-8, and Buford retired to the couch to watch his teammates play. “Coach Rich got a ping-pong table at his house so he’s pretty good,” Buford said. “I suck. I just play it to have fun.” During the following game, Smith, a spectator at the time, was called for “hands.” Every player in the room slapped Smith hard on the back of the hand. Buford slapped twice after Smith flinched the first time. You get called for hands “if you say something dumb,” Boston College transfer Evan Ravenel said. “Something real dumb.” At 3 p.m., the games stopped as the team convened to watch film on the Purdue offense. Buford’s eyes were fixed on the screen for the entire 25 minutes while he rotated his ankle, trying to keep it loose. No one spoke as coach Thad Matta and his assistants broke down the footage. As the team left for the court, Buford returned to the training room to have his ankle taped a final time before entering the gym. Buford did not participate in the practice because of his injury and instead did individual shooting and dribbling drills. “It was kind of frustrating because I’m not used to it,” he said. “What is that, my second time (missing practice) in three years? It didn’t feel normal.” Buford stuck his head into the first-team huddles during full-court drills. “I was just seeing what they were running,” he said. “I didn’t want to be left out.” After practice concluded, the team stayed on the floor, shooting around and playing games. Buford placed second to assistant coach Brandon Miller in one game involving 3-point shooting. “I had to let him win,” Buford said, laughing. Buford, freshman guard Jordan Sibert and senior guard Eddie Days left the court at 5:20 p.m., the last three players to leave. Buford returned to the training room for treatment. After five minutes with his ankle in the hot tub to loosen the muscles, athletic trainer Chalisa Fonza began to administer a Sound Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (SASTM) massage, a technique involving small instruments that Fonza has been working with for three years. “I’m going real easy because he has to play tomorrow,” Fonza said. The grimace on Buford’s face would suggest the opposite. Buford jokingly bit a towel and asked freshman guard Aaron Craft to talk to him while he got the massage. “You feel that crunchy-crunch?” Fonza said while rubbing a small purple instrument on the ligaments on the front of his ankle. “That’s the problem.” For Buford, the entire technique was a problem. “That was my first time ever getting it. I don’t want to get that thing no more; that thing hurts,” he said. “She said she has to give it to me again on Wednesday, so it is what it is.” After the massage and a round in the ice tub, Buford changed into his street cloths, got taped up again and left the arena. At 6:35 p.m. Buford stepped into his car, ready to head home to the apartment he lives in alone at Olentangy Commons. He planned on studying, icing his ankle and resting in preparation for the next night’s game. Buford started in Tuesday’s game against Purdue. The junior logged 23 minutes and a team-high 19 points in the team’s 87-64 victory. read more

Commentary Ohio States Deshaun Thomas has patience maturity to make it in

It’s been almost two weeks since Ohio State men’s basketball forward Deshaun Thomas announced he is leaving early to enter the 2013 NBA Draft. Being one of Thomas’ biggest supporters this past season, my heart sank when I heard about his decision, but it is one that I fully understand and respect. Something that I am struggling to understand is all the so-called “experts” saying that he will not have much success at the next level. Some say he is not quick enough to defend at an elite level and earn playing time. Some say he is too selfish and takes too many bad shots that will frustrate coaches. Some say that he is a “me first” player who will get frustrated when he does not get shots. This madness needs to stop now. Thomas led the Big Ten in scoring this past season at 19.8 points per game and scored in double digits in every game. He shot 83 percent from the free throw line, 34 percent from behind the arc and an impressive 45 percent overall. Thomas made all of that happen while being the main scoring option on a limited offensive team and thus getting the opposing team’s best defense thrown at him every game. Sure, sometimes he forced some outside shots that were cause for frustration and he was not as good as of a defender as some people might have liked. But when you play on the same team as junior guard Aaron Craft and sophomore guard Shannon Scott, you are never going to look as good defensively as you want. The truth of the matter is Thomas improved the defensive part of his game immensely during his three years at OSU. He never visibly got upset when he was not getting the ball, and when his shots were not going in, he wasn’t afraid to keep firing away with confidence. Take the NCAA tournament, for example. In both the third-round game against Iowa State and Sweet 16 matchup against Arizona, it was Craft and sophomore forward LaQuinton Ross, respectively, who made game-winning shots to help the Buckeyes advance. I will admit that I wanted Thomas to be the one with the ball in his hands at the end of the game, but after both of the shots went in, he was among the first to hug his teammates in excitement. I’ve never seen a player who enjoys playing basketball as much as Thomas. He rarely seems to be upset and is usually smiling. I know that I am biased, but after watching the OSU episode of “The Journey” on Big Ten Network, I could not help but think that Thomas is tremendously positive and has the right outlook toward life. I think those qualities will translate well to the NBA. At 6-foot-7, Thomas most likely will play wing in the NBA. His critics say that he is not quick enough to play on the outside and too short to play on the inside. However, Thomas possesses an exceptional mid-range jump shot and has proven that he can get it off thanks to a quick release. He also excels in isolation situations, a trait that will work well at the next level. The topic that is rarely mentioned is how much Thomas has matured in comparison to his freshman year at OSU. For example, during the Wisconsin game in Columbus on Jan. 29, he got the ball in transition with an opportunity to try and score against three defenders. He chose instead to wait for his teammates to get down the court to set up the offense. Two years ago, Thomas might have tried to be the hero and score in that situation. Something as simple as that shows how much he has grown and how smart he is as a player. I’m not saying that he should be a lottery pick. What I am saying is that the team that drafts him will get a player who loves the game, is willing to work hard and can score from anywhere on the court. I think he deserves to be selected in the first-round, and after going through the adjustment period that nearly every player goes through when he makes the jump from the college to professional ranks, he will be a productive player. No matter how you feel about it now, I’m sure Thomas will be fun to watch, and I know that I will certainly be tuning in. Eric Seger is a Big Ten Network Student U intern. read more

Womens basketball Ohio State selected as No 5 seed in Lexington region

Ohio State junior guard Kelsey Mitchell drives to the basket and attempts a layup against Purdue in the Big Ten tournament semifinal in Indianapolis on March 4. Credit: Ashley Nelson | Sports DirectorThe Ohio State women’s basketball team (26-6) has been selected to the NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Tournament as the No. 5 seed in the Lexington region and will play No. 12 seed Western Kentucky on Friday.The Big Ten regular-season champion Buckeyes will play the first two rounds in Lexington, Kentucky with a possible matchup against the No. 4 seed Kentucky Wildcats in the second round.This is OSU’s 24th appearance all-time in the NCAA tournament and the program’s third straight appearance. Last season, OSU lost as a No. 2 seed to No. 6 seed Tennessee in the Sweet 16.OSU finished at No. 11 in the final Associated Press Top 25 poll.The Buckeyes are coming off a Purdue upset in the semifinals of the Big Ten tournament on March 4. The Boilermakers halted OSU’s momentum, ending their 12 game win streak. Big Ten Player of the Year Kelsey Mitchell leads the charge for OSU with 23 points per game, which ranks sixth nationally. Mitchell also averages 2.8 assists per game and is shooting 44 percent from the field and 37 percent from 3.Senior forward Shayla Cooper averages 10.5 points and 6.3 rebounds per game. Redshirt sophomore guard Sierra Calhoun is one of OSU’s top outside threats, splashing in 39 percent of her 3-point attempts this season.It’s still a question whether or not redshirt junior forward Stephanie Mavunga will be available for the NCAA tournament. The Big Ten’s leading rebounder went down with a foot injury in the final month of the season and hasn’t played since Feb. 4 at Wisconsin. read more

Inter to secure two more new players Luciano Spalletti

first_imgInter Milan Coach Luciano Spalletti says even though “there are difficulties and things to complete”, the club’s squad needs two more new players.Inter Milan have been out in search for a right-back and there are reports they already close to Atletico Madrid’s Sime Vrsaljko as they also target Bayern Munich midfielder, Arturo Vidal.“There are reinforcements, but there are difficulties and things to complete,” Spalletti told SportMediaset as quoted in Football Italia.Romelu Lukaku, Serie A, Inter MilanCapello calls Lukaku “a modern striker” Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 The former Italian manager believes Romelu Lukaku is perfectly suited for Antonio Conte’s Internazionale Milan in the Serie A.“With an army of feeling behind us it’s important to have a good season, and to do so takes certain characteristics, a number of the right players to cover all competitions.“We all know that a couple of pieces are missing, but not to give me an advantage. It’s for the 40,000 that have always been there.”The nerazzurri already signed six players this summer and have been linked with the likes of Matteo Darmian, Mateo Kovacic. Inter have signed Stefan de Vrij from Lazio on a free transfer, Radja Nainggolan has arrived from Roma and Matteo Politano has been secured on a loan deal from Sassuolo.last_img read more

Pochettino explains why he allowed Kane to play in FA Cup

first_imgThe Spurs were up 6-0 against Tranmere Rovers in the FA Cup, and Mauricio Pochettino still decided to sub in his captain for the second half.Tottenham Hotspur was easily winning 6-0 against Tranmere Rovers in the FA Cup Third Round.But Spurs manager Mauricio Pochettino decided to play one of his best players: captain Harry Kane.Kane went on to score Tottenham’s seventh goal, and Pochettino was questioned why would he subbed Kane in.“It was respect,” Pochettino said after the game according to Goal.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…“Respect the people, respect the opponent. They’re not going to have many chances to see Harry Kane play here in a competition like the FA Cup.”“I think it was a great atmosphere. For different reasons, I decided to make a change and put Kane on the pitch but one of them is that,” he commented.“It’s important to show respect to the people here so they could see Harry Kane, who is an icon in English football. It is difficult in that division to see it. It was important to see him in action.”“Like all the competitions, we take it very seriously,” he added.“Of course sometimes you can win and sometimes you can lose, but always we are serious and respect the competition.”last_img read more