Trade, not aid, say youth

first_imgDr Petrus de Kock of Brand South Africa, left, with Minister Alexander Stubb of Finland. Mandela foundation CEO Achmat Dangor urged Africa’syoung people to make the future their own.(Images: Janine Erasmus)MEDIA CONTACTS • Leo MakgamatheBrand South Africa+27 11 483 0122RELATED ARTICLES• Pupils get a lesson on dignity• Empowering young people in SA• All aboard the Youth Express• Rewarding youth excellenceJanine ErasmusSouthern Africa is hosting a business delegation led by the Finnish minister of European affairs and foreign trade, Alexander Stubb. The emphasis of the trip is to promote exports and boost Finnish businesses already operating in Southern Africa, while looking for new opportunities.Stubb and his delegation are currently in Windhoek, Namibia. In South Africa they visited Pretoria, Johannesburg and Cape Town, where they met Reserve Bank governor Gill Marcus and the ministers of transport and higher education, among others.The visit was put together by global organisation Finpro, which promotes and supports Finnish companies in international markets, including South Africa. The company’s local offices are in Johannesburg.Other members of the delegation include Jussi Pajunen, the mayor of Helsinki, and representatives from the Haaga-Helia University of Applied Sciences, Nokia Siemens Networks, and the Tampere University of Applied Sciences, among others.In Cape Town, the delegation took part in Helsinki Meets Cape Town, an event with a focus on the Mother City as the world design capital 2014 – Helsinki had this honour in 2012. The event is expected to provide more opportunities for partnerships between the two countries through a series of workshops, discussions and social gatherings where experiences from 2012 were shared whilst building anticipation for 2014.Other participants in the Cape Town event included Finpro, the Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Aalto University, and Finnish and local companies.South Africa is one of Finland’s top trading partners outside the OECD countries, a 34-nation group known as the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. In terms of imports and exports, the country is Finland’s biggest trade partner in Africa.Trade is also growing between Finland and Namibia, with the annual value of Finnish exports to Namibia standing at about US$3.2-million (R28-million) over the last few years.From alienation to cooperationIn Johannesburg Stubb visited the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, which is currently undergoing renovations that will see the premises, originally Mandela’s post-presidential office, turned into a public facility with a library, discussion venue, permanent exhibition and state-of-the-art archive for the hundreds of priceless items held there.At a gathering later the same day, Stubb and his delegation took part in a discussion with the theme Africa-European economic relations: from alienation to cooperation.The dialogue was facilitated by Brand South Africa, with the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, as part of Brand South Africa’s Shape the Future initiative. A number of students, among them Mandela Rhodes scholars, were also present.“There has been another shift in world politics,” said Stubb, explaining that the first major shifts came after the Second World War and the end of the Cold War. “Now we have a multipolar world, with numerous blocs such as Brics, the G8, G20, Old Russia, Southeast Asia, and so we have to adapt our trade and foreign policies accordingly. I welcome this.”The makeup of the global economy is also changing, said Stubb – currently the US contributes 23%, China contributes 10% and Africa just 2%, but this will change. The world won’t always be dominated by the West.“South Africa is one of the EU’s strategic partners, and Africa is the place where the future lies,” he said. “We in the West need to understand this.”But Africa has historically been alienated from the West because of the policies of interaction driven by paternalism, exploitation and colonialism, whereas they should be driven by cooperation.“We need to link Africa and Europe with what I call a dignified foreign policy,” Stubb asserted. “One that does not have conditions attached or that is driven by the country’s own agenda.”It’s up to the youthThe topic of conversation then turned to Africa’s young people.“Within 10 years, 60% of Africans will be under the age of 35,” said Achmat Dangor, CEO of the Nelson Mandela Foundation. “These are the people in which we need to invest – they literally have the future in their hands.”He said that Africans themselves must create an enabling environment for proper investment from the West and the accountable use of funding, but this means that Africans need to change the way they view themselves, so that developed nations will follow suit.“It would be wrong for us to turn away development aid,” said Dangor. “We don’t have 60 years to build up a strong regional bloc, like the EU had.”It’s up to young people to take the lead, he said.Stubb agreed, saying that he personally believed that leaders should not hang on to their posts for decades, but should relinquish them within a reasonable time so that the government does not grow stale and that young ideas are always available.Invest in us, say young peopleYoung Africans at the event then took the floor, identifying several issues that, they felt, were holding the continent back.Among these were the perceived lack of capacity for efficient project and financial management in governments; the fact that foreign aid has, in some cases, had a negative effect because it has not been managed properly or has been used as a political tool; and the continuing conflicts in many countries, which hamper young people and prevent them from becoming empowered.The issue of corruption was also raised, with some saying that all the education in the world won’t help if leaders are taking backhanders from overseas.“What can the EU do for African youth in these matters?” they asked.Impressed that Africa’s young people were so insightful and aware of the challenges facing them, Stubb promised to take their concerns to heart once he was back home. In the meantime he named certain lessons that his own country had learned, sometimes the hard way, which he felt could work in the African context too.“When we went into recession in the 1990s, we had to rethink our policies,” he said. “We poured money into education and research and development, especially in ICT – this has led to the dominance of companies such as Nokia, although that is not so much the case today. So we have to reinvent again. We are now interested in clean technology and sustainable development.”Investment in humanities and human capacity was a solution put forward by many – “invest in our education, in science, in the exchange of ideas,” said one attendee.This is the challenge of the next generation, said Dangor – to create an environment where allies such as Finland will feel comfortable to have dealings.Although there wasn’t enough time to properly unpack all the issues and put forward suggestions to tackle them, the evening’s facilitator, Petrus de Kock of Brand South Africa, promised that there would be follow-up dialogues.last_img read more

Inspiration! 12 Excellent Aerial Photography Reels

first_imgWe’ve rounded up the very best aerial photography reels from around the ‘net!  Incredible shots from an elevated perspective.Aerial photography has come a long way in the last few years.  New radio controlled aircraft technology coupled with lighter, higher resolution cams, equals some really amazing aerial photography work.  In the following aerial photography demo reels you’ll see a variety of production styles and equipment, from DSLR outfitted RC helicopters to breathtaking video images shot with Cineflex aerial and RED cams.  See the world from an elevated perspective in this aerial photography roundup!Brain Farm Aerial Reel 2012 by Brain Farm2012 Reel by SnapRoll MediaCopter Kids Aerial Reel by Trent PalmerAerial Reel by RC Aerial Cam by RC Aerial CamJ&G 2010 Aerial Selects Reel by Jewell&GinnieVortex Aerial 2012 Demo Reel by Vortex AerialBirds Eye Productions Demo Reel by Birds Eye ProductionsAERIAL REEL by Daniele FerreroBali Aerial Reel by 3headsDemo Reel 2011 by Horizon Aerial PhotographyAerial Reel by meg kettellIndie Aerial Reel 2012 by Indie Aerials Reellast_img read more

CJ Perez early favorite for NCAA MVP

first_imgPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netIt’s just halfway through NCAA Season 93 but Lyceum’s forward CJ Perez is being tabbed as the early favorite to win the MVP award in the men’s basketball tournament.Perez is the league’s top scorer after the first round after putting up 18.6 points to go along 5.6 rebounds, 3.2 assists, and 1.6 steals across nine games with the Pirates yet to drop a match.ADVERTISEMENT Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games MOST READ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Biggest Pogo service provider padlocked for tax evasion Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Arellano, NU banner PVL Collegiate conference Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim But for the swingman, though, winning the MVP is just a bonus as he and the team have their eyes on the bigger trophy.“I’m thinking more of helping the team win a championship,” said Perez, who will play for the Pirates for this season only. “If I win the MVP, that would be just a bonus.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingPirates head coach Topex Robinson said he’s glad Perez earned the recognition this early in the season.“It’s something he earned, and it’s obviously there,” said Robinson Wednesday. “We, however, don’t usually discuss it with the team.”last_img read more

10 months ago​Heaton backtracks on Burnley future

first_img​Heaton backtracks on Burnley futureby Ansser Sadiq10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveTom Heaton has played down speculation of leaving Burnley.The 32-year-old goalkeeper was previously adamant about his desire to leave, as he was not getting regular game-time.But a start against West Ham, which was his first in the league, has eased his mind. Heaton kept a clean sheet as his team notched a 2-0 win at home.”I never wanted to leave the football club, it’s just the fact that I wasn’t playing that I would have had to,” said the goalkeeper after the game.”But after being back playing today it’s the last thing on my mind to be honest.”At 32 I don’t really have much time to waste. Not for one minute did I want to go anywhere but sometimes it has got to be looked at.”That probably changes now. It’s great to be back out there and I can’t tell you how pleased I am to be back out on the pitch and pull on that shirt again.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

US to back UN declaration on Indigenous peoples Obama

first_img(U.S. President Barack Obama. Whitehouse.gov/Photo)APTN National NewsWASHINGTON, D.C.–U.S. President Barack Obama said Thursday his administration would be supporting reversing position and supporting the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.Obama made the announcement while speaking at the Tribal Nations Congress which was organized by the White House.“As you know, in April, we announced that we were reviewing our position on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. And today I can announce that the United States is lending its support to the declaration,” said Obama, according to a transcript of his speech.Obama’s announcement follows a similar about face by Canada which announced last month that it would be endorsing the declaration.Canada and the U.S. were the last holdouts on the declaration among countries that had voted against the documents. Australia and New Zealand have already endorsed the document.In his speech, Obama said he was hoping his administration had reached a “turning point” in the relationship with Native Americans. He said the declaration affirmed aspirations he wanted his government to support.“The aspirations (the declaration) affirms, including respect for the institutions and rich cultures of Native peoples, are one we must always seek to fulfill,” said Obama. “What matters far more than words, what matters far more than any resolution and declaration, are actions to match those words.”last_img read more

Rafael Nadal Is Playing Mind Games With You

It’s a smart and subtle way to serve in the situation, and his success rate suggests that his opponent, potentially predisposed to Nadal’s T serve, does not see it coming.Granted, it’s also a bit of a “tell” for anyone lucky enough to find himself with a pair of break points against Nadal — those guys should look for the out wide serve. But more than that, it reveals a mental game-within-the-game orchestrated by Nadal.He turns balls hit to his backhand side into forehand winnersNadal’s forehand is his biggest weapon. Opponents try to dodge it at all costs, which means avoiding hitting the ball to the ad court as much as possible against the southpaw. A good way to understand the baseline is to divide it into four vertical zones — two in the deuce court and two in the ad court. In tennis, these zones are sometimes labeled A, B, C and D, with A being the out wide in the deuce court, all the way to the D zone, which is the out wide in the ad court.If you’re Nadal’s opponent and you’re trying to avoid his forehand, you would hit to zones A and B (the ad court). And that’s where he gets you.The King of Clay is also the King of Running Around His Backhand to Hit Forehand. He’s an expert at it. Indeed, he loves to run around his backhand to hit forehand so much that in some matches, he has hit about the same number of winners from what would be his natural backhand side of the court — zones A and B — than from his normal, left-handed forehand side of the court — zones C and D. Through five rounds at this year’s French Open, 54 percent of Nadal’s forehand winners (46/85) have been hit as run-around forehands from zones A and B, according to officially recorded statistics from Roland Garros.By comparison, consider the right-handed Djokovic, the number one player in the world. Through the first four rounds at Roland Garros this year, 42 percent of Djokovic’s forehand winners have been run-around forehands (14/33).Nadal is like a spider looking to snare a rally ball, and players would be ill-advised to hit toward Nadal’s backhand unless they can be sure he’ll only be able to use his backhand. At the same time, better not hit too far out wide or the errors will flow.Just when you think you know Nadal, think again. He will bend your mind more than he bends the ball. When you think of Rafael Nadal, you might think of a player who hits balls with hellacious topspin and grinds out points on clay. His RPMs and his sweat grab the glory. But the 11-time French Open champion uses a few insidious tricks that go beyond the obvious strokes and traditional tactics.All of Rafa’s ways and means traveled to Roland Garros in 2019 — the energy, the rituals, the patterns of play — it’s all been put to use in another run to the semifinals, this time at age 33. He’ll need every tactic at his disposal, the conspicuous and the cunning, as he takes on Roger Federer and potentially Novak Djokovic after that.Here are three examples of the subtle mental maneuvers that Nadal makes against his opponents.He makes them waitStrictly from a length-of-match standpoint, Nadal is one of the slowest tennis players of this era. And there are a host of things Nadal does to extend matches — and possibly distract and annoy his opponents in the process.The ultimate creature of habit, Nadal starts managing time with his first step on court. When the chair umpire prepares to toss the coin and the presence of both players is required in the middle of the court before the start of the match, Nadal is typically the second to arrive — after a delay of several seconds while he goes through his routines with water bottles.Once the match is underway, Nadal’s pre-point rituals have been fodder for everything from complaints to comedy routines. Even the typically chilled-out Roger Federer has been critical of the time that Nadal takes between points. By rule, players are limited to 25 seconds between points. Beginning this year at most events, the sport put in formal, visible shot clocks in an attempt to keep servers from abusing the rule.According to an analysis by Melbourne, Australia-based Data Driven Sports Analytics of more than 140 matches each for Nadal, Federer and Djokovic from 2008 through this year, Rafa averaged 26.1 seconds between points when serving — the longest of the so-called “Big 3.”1Djokovic averaged 25.2 seconds, while Federer averaged 18.6. Nadal’s average time between points is over the limit — and that’s just an average, which means that he regularly serves beyond the 25-second rule. Chair umpires can use their discretion in starting the clock, so, clearly, Nadal is getting some wiggle room.Nadal finds a way to play on Rafa time when he’s returning as well, going through a catalog of rituals and often turning his back on the server or lifting his racquet until he’s ready to receive.The overall effect is that Nadal asserts his own pace of play, which can be legitimately discomfiting for opponents.He conditions them like PavlovOne of the hardest things to do in professional tennis is return serves. Speeds regularly top 125 mph, and then there’s the spin. Professional tennis players also excel at “spot serving” — landing serves in precise locations. They most often hit close to the lines of the service box, placing the serve at angles to inflict the most damage. Those most-visited, go-to spots are either up the T, which is the middle of the court, or out wide, which is on the outer edge of the service box. Servers work hard to place their serves effectively on both the deuce side (serving from the right side to the servers’ left and returners’ right), when the game score is usually tied, and on the ad side, when one player is always ahead.Nadal has a curious modus operandi when serving on the deuce side. The effect is Pavlovian: It conditions his opponents for one thing and then kills them with another.Because Nadal is a left-handed server, the natural play for him in this situation is to serve up the T. The ATP Tour has collected serve placement data from 2011 to 2019 for Masters 1000 events, which are just beneath Grand Slams and the Tour Finals in terms of stature, ranking points and prize money. According to that data set, on clay, Nadal’s first serve has been up the T 56.4 percent of the time on the deuce side. His success rate for this location — meaning how often he wins the point — is a healthy 68.5 percent. Much less often — 27 percent of the time — Nadal takes his first serve out wide from the deuce court on clay. And in that spot, his success rate is eye-popping, 74.8 percent. In 2019 alone, it’s up to 79.2 percent.Why would Nadal use a serve that is statistically so successful for him so infrequently? It’s possible that the tactic is about mentally conditioning the returner, greasing the tracks as it were, and then flipping his pattern when he really needs it.Indeed, data from that same set of ATP Masters tournaments reveals this morsel about Nadal on clay: He habitually hits his first serve from the deuce court up the T on nearly all scores. The most notable exception: when he’s down 15-40. When Nadal faces two break points against him, his primary service pattern switches to his secondary, “money” spot — the out wide. At 15-40, he goes T only 39.7 percent of the time, and his primary pattern becomes out-wide, at 44.9 percent.How does the King of Clay perform with that deuce court, out-wide serve down two break points? Put simply, he crushes: 82.9 percent of the time he wins the point. read more

Evan Turners No 21 to be raised to the rafters at Feb

Former OSU guard Evan Turner (21) is set to have his number retired on Feb. 16.Credit: Courtesy of TNSA fifth number will soon be hanging from the rafters of the Schottenstein Center to signify Ohio State men’s basketball immortality: Evan Turner’s No. 21.The former three-year OSU guard made Columbus his home from 2007-2010, winning the Naismith Award for the top player in the country for his final 2009-10 season. In that year, he averaged 20.4 points per game on 51.9 percent shooting and added 6.0 assists and 9.2 rebounds per contest.Turner left for the NBA after his junior season, where he went second overall to the Philadelphia 76ers. After parts of four seasons there and a brief stop in Indiana, the Chicago native now comes off the bench for the Boston Celtics, averaging about 27 minutes per game.The 6-foot-7 Turner was the fourth individual OSU player to win the national player of the year award. He finished his collegiate career 18th in OSU scoring with 1,517 points and ninth in assists with 414.The No. 21 is scheduled to be lifted on Feb. 16 in a halftime ceremony during a game against Michigan, the same opponent Turner hit a famous buzzer-beating 3-pointer against in the 2010 Big Ten tournament quarterfinals.Turner’s number will join John Havlicek’s No. 5, Jerry Lucas’s No. 11, Jim Jackson’s No. 22 and Gary Bradds’ No. 35 in the Schottenstein Center rafters. All but Havlicek won a national player of the year award.The game against Michigan is scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. on Feb. 16. read more

A day in the life of Ohio State guard William Buford

You might know that William Buford is the starting guard for the No. 1-ranked Ohio State basketball team, but you might not know that he is a quiet student, a below average ping-pong player, loves the kids’ meal at Raising Canes and his car could use a trip to the shop. Buford arrived at Central Classroom Building at 10:32 a.m. Monday. He walked briskly up the stairs on the right to get to his 10:30 a.m. class, Swahili 102. Even though he arrived a few minutes after the bell, students were still settling in and Buford found his seat in the middle of the room without causing a disruption. He is not the only recognizable athlete in the class, as football players Jaamal Berry, Mike Adams and Michael Brewster were also in attendance. Buford talked with Berry while the professor distributed a graded quiz. “Most of the athletes, we stay together and try to be close,” Buford said. As the last quiz was handed out and class lecture began, the talking stopped. Buford took notes and did not talk again until the opportunity to work in groups arose. “I’m pretty shy in class. I really don’t say too much,” Buford said. “I try to stay out of the way and get my work done.” As class came to a close, Buford checked with a classmate to make sure he was clear on the assignment for the next class. “Seventy-two sentences?” he said, shocked at the amount of work. With only one class on Mondays and Wednesdays, Buford had finished his academic load for the day. His obligations, however, were far from over. He made the short walk from Central Classrooms to the Tuttle Parking Garage and climbed into his silver 2004 Pontiac Grand Prix, which has been on campus since his sophomore year. The “check engine” light was on as he left the parking garage. Buford drove to Parks Hall and picked up his teammate, senior guard David Lighty. Buford moved to the passenger seat, which was already as far back as the car would allow, and let Lighty drive while he made a call about getting the car serviced. The two starters pulled into the Schottenstein Center parking lot and made their way to the player’s entrance. Buford slowed down and waited for Rob, his barber, who cuts his and Lighty’s hair in the locker room. Rob has been coming to the arena to cut Buford’s hair since the player’s freshman year. With a prime-time game against Purdue to be aired on ESPN the following evening, the timing couldn’t have been better. “I just really needed a haircut since last week, but it worked out that way,” Buford said, smiling. A chair was set up in the bathroom portion of the locker room and Rob opened his bag and went to work. Buford played music on his phone, the EVO, while barber and client rapped along. Buford wandered to the upper bowl of the arena after the 35-minute haircut, in search of an ATM so he could pay Rob. After compensating the barber, he dropped some things off in his locker, which stands between Lighty’s and freshman guard Lenzelle Smith Jr.’s. Buford then retreated to the team’s ping-pong table to pass the time. “Everybody plays,” he said. “We compete a lot at ping-pong.” After 30 more minutes, Lighty’s hair was cut and the two tried to decide where to get food. They agreed on Raising Cane’s and Buford left to pick up the order while Lighty studied. Buford walked into the location on Ackerman Road and ordered a kids’ meal for himself and one for Lighty. “We always get the kids’ meal,” Buford said. “We got practice so we aren’t trying to get too full.” Numerous patrons and employees stared at the basketball player as he placed his order and waited for it to be filled. “I don’t pay attention,” he said of the added attention. “I try not to make eye contact with people.” After returning to the locker room, Buford ate his lunch while watching SportsCenter. At 1:40 p.m., he left the locker room and headed to the training room for treatment on an ankle injury he suffered against Illinois on Jan. 22. With Tuesday’s game looming, Buford needed the ankle treatment in order to play. Under the guidance of team athletic trainer Vince O’Brien, Buford iced his ankle for three different increments of five minutes with stretching exercises in between. After an hour in the training room, Buford returned to the locker room for more ping-pong before the team film session. Strength and conditioning coach Dave Richardson challenged Buford to a game. “I’m about to Forrest Gump his ass,” Buford said. Richardson swapped out the traditional paddle for a small block of wood with an Ohio State emblem on it. “If I beat you with this, you’re not allowed to play anymore,” Richardson said, laughing. Richardson won, 21-8, and Buford retired to the couch to watch his teammates play. “Coach Rich got a ping-pong table at his house so he’s pretty good,” Buford said. “I suck. I just play it to have fun.” During the following game, Smith, a spectator at the time, was called for “hands.” Every player in the room slapped Smith hard on the back of the hand. Buford slapped twice after Smith flinched the first time. You get called for hands “if you say something dumb,” Boston College transfer Evan Ravenel said. “Something real dumb.” At 3 p.m., the games stopped as the team convened to watch film on the Purdue offense. Buford’s eyes were fixed on the screen for the entire 25 minutes while he rotated his ankle, trying to keep it loose. No one spoke as coach Thad Matta and his assistants broke down the footage. As the team left for the court, Buford returned to the training room to have his ankle taped a final time before entering the gym. Buford did not participate in the practice because of his injury and instead did individual shooting and dribbling drills. “It was kind of frustrating because I’m not used to it,” he said. “What is that, my second time (missing practice) in three years? It didn’t feel normal.” Buford stuck his head into the first-team huddles during full-court drills. “I was just seeing what they were running,” he said. “I didn’t want to be left out.” After practice concluded, the team stayed on the floor, shooting around and playing games. Buford placed second to assistant coach Brandon Miller in one game involving 3-point shooting. “I had to let him win,” Buford said, laughing. Buford, freshman guard Jordan Sibert and senior guard Eddie Days left the court at 5:20 p.m., the last three players to leave. Buford returned to the training room for treatment. After five minutes with his ankle in the hot tub to loosen the muscles, athletic trainer Chalisa Fonza began to administer a Sound Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (SASTM) massage, a technique involving small instruments that Fonza has been working with for three years. “I’m going real easy because he has to play tomorrow,” Fonza said. The grimace on Buford’s face would suggest the opposite. Buford jokingly bit a towel and asked freshman guard Aaron Craft to talk to him while he got the massage. “You feel that crunchy-crunch?” Fonza said while rubbing a small purple instrument on the ligaments on the front of his ankle. “That’s the problem.” For Buford, the entire technique was a problem. “That was my first time ever getting it. I don’t want to get that thing no more; that thing hurts,” he said. “She said she has to give it to me again on Wednesday, so it is what it is.” After the massage and a round in the ice tub, Buford changed into his street cloths, got taped up again and left the arena. At 6:35 p.m. Buford stepped into his car, ready to head home to the apartment he lives in alone at Olentangy Commons. He planned on studying, icing his ankle and resting in preparation for the next night’s game. Buford started in Tuesday’s game against Purdue. The junior logged 23 minutes and a team-high 19 points in the team’s 87-64 victory. read more

Crew tie Sounders FC with late penaltykick goal by Renteria

Success against Seattle Sounders FC is rare for the Columbus Crew and, for now, they have to be content with a tie. Seattle took an early 1-0 lead Saturday at Crew Stadium after forward Fredy Montero’s headed goal in the seventh minute. Columbus responded with a 67th-minute penalty kick goal by forward Emilio Renteria. Despite Columbus’ persistent offensive attack, the game ended in a 1-1 tie. Seattle (3-3-4) made itself comfortable in the rainy conditions early in the first half when midfielder Erik Friberg served a cross into the Columbus penalty area. Montero gave Seattle its lead when he leaped to head the ball, which deflected off the post and went past Crew goalkeeper William Hesmer. Crew defender Chad Marshall said the ball played into the Crew’s penalty area by Friberg was “weird.” “It was just a weird cross,” Marshall said. “It was a good finish by (Montero). It’s just gotta be better organization by us.” Columbus (3-1-4) took four shots on Seattle’s goal in the first half, forcing two saves by goalkeeper Kasey Keller. One of the two on-target shots belonged to Crew midfielder Robbie Rogers. Rogers came close to leveling the score in the 32nd minute when a seemingly harmless clearance by Columbus skipped through Seattle’s defensive line. Rogers sprinted to collect the ball, but had minimal time to get a shot off as Keller met him at the top of the Seattle penalty area and kicked the shot aside. “(Keller) made a great save,” Rogers said. “He got it with his hand. Of course, I would like to score that.” The Crew went into halftime trailing, 1-0, but came out firing in the second half. A corner kick by forward Eddie Gaven in the 65th minute eventually resulted in a game-tying goal for Columbus. After Gaven hit his corner, Seattle defender Patrick Ianni pulled Marshall to the ground inside the Sounders’ penalty area. As a result, referee Mark Kadlecik awarded a penalty kick to Columbus. Marshall, who pulled his shirt up to expose scratch marks on his chest as he talked to reporters after the game, said he was glad the referee awarded the penalty. “(Gaven) hit a good ball in,” Marshall said. “I got away from (Ianni) and he had to foul me, I guess. The ball was coming right to me. I’ve got freaking marks all over me.” Renteria took the penalty attempt for the Crew and knocked it passed Keller to tie the game, 1-1. With the goal, Renteria has now scored all four of his goals this season in Columbus’ last three matches. The Crew’s pressure on the Sounders’ defense — and Keller — did not subside. As play continued into the final minutes of the match, Columbus had accumulated 13 second-half shots, while Seattle managed only one shot on Hesmer in the half. Columbus also failed to convert on a flurry of opportunities in stoppage time, which began with a diving save from Keller. Midfielder Andres Mendoza came on in the 61st minute as a second-half substitute for the Crew, and took the kick from just outside the Sounders’ penalty area, which Keller parried over his goal. The Crew’s chances in stoppage time also included three corner kicks, none of which resulted in a goal. Kadlecik blew his whistle to end the game in a 1-1 tie after Seattle cleared the last of Columbus’ corners. After the match, Crew coach Robert Warzycha said Columbus responded well to the Sounders’ early goal. “Second half, completely different game,” he said. “We pushed for the goal, and we obviously scored one and we’d like to have scored another one. (We) created numerous chances in the end, and we didn’t get lucky. The most important thing is the result.” The Crew next will travel to California for a Saturday match against the San Jose Earthquakes. Kickoff is scheduled for 10 p.m. read more

Inter to secure two more new players Luciano Spalletti

first_imgInter Milan Coach Luciano Spalletti says even though “there are difficulties and things to complete”, the club’s squad needs two more new players.Inter Milan have been out in search for a right-back and there are reports they already close to Atletico Madrid’s Sime Vrsaljko as they also target Bayern Munich midfielder, Arturo Vidal.“There are reinforcements, but there are difficulties and things to complete,” Spalletti told SportMediaset as quoted in Football Italia.Romelu Lukaku, Serie A, Inter MilanCapello calls Lukaku “a modern striker” Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 The former Italian manager believes Romelu Lukaku is perfectly suited for Antonio Conte’s Internazionale Milan in the Serie A.“With an army of feeling behind us it’s important to have a good season, and to do so takes certain characteristics, a number of the right players to cover all competitions.“We all know that a couple of pieces are missing, but not to give me an advantage. It’s for the 40,000 that have always been there.”The nerazzurri already signed six players this summer and have been linked with the likes of Matteo Darmian, Mateo Kovacic. Inter have signed Stefan de Vrij from Lazio on a free transfer, Radja Nainggolan has arrived from Roma and Matteo Politano has been secured on a loan deal from Sassuolo.last_img read more