Mourinho blames Man City ‘education’ for bust up

first_imgJosé Mourinho Mourinho suggests Man City ‘education’ to blame for derby bust up Ryan Benson Last updated 1 year ago 23:06 12/12/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(3) mourinho-cropped Getty Images José Mourinho Manchester United v Manchester City Manchester City Manchester United v AFC Bournemouth Manchester United Premier League Players and staff of both sides are said to have ended up in a scuffle after Sunday’s derby and the United boss was careful when discussing it Jose Mourinho believes the alleged fracas between Manchester United and City players after Sunday’s derby came down to a “diversity in behaviour” and “education”.City left Old Trafford with a 2-1 win thanks to goals from David Silva and Nicolas Otamendi, opening up an 11-point lead ahead of United at the top of the table.But news later broke about an incident in the tunnel after the match, with reports suggesting Mourinho and several members of United’s team and coaching staff reacted angrily to apparently disrespectful celebrations. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player The FA confirmed they had contacted both clubs for their versions of events, with City coach Mikel Arteta suffering a head wound and Mourinho said to have been struck by a bottle.The controversy understandably dominated the questions in Mourinho’s pre-match news conference ahead of Wednesday’s visit of Bournemouth and, although United’s press officer eventually shut things down, the Portuguese coach did give a fairly cryptic response to why tempers flared.When informed that Pep Guardiola spoke of his respect for United but defended his side for their part in the bust up in his news conference, Mourinho said: “He says, he says. I’m not there to comment on his words.”The only thing I can say is it was just a question of diversity; diversity in behaviours, diversity in education.”Nothing more than that. That’s all I’m going to say.”United will be eager to bounce back from their derby disappointment when Bournemouth visit, and Mourinho expects that he will see extra desire from his players.Jose Mourinho Manchester UnitedAnder Herrera, Nicolas Otamendi, Manchester United vs Manchester City, 17/18“As always when you lose, you probably have a little bit more desire to win,” he said.”Nobody wants to lose once or twice; I think it’s something that belongs to every team in the world.”When you lose, you want to win your next game – you have better desire. The motivation is based on we want to try to win all the time.”When you have a bad result, you don’t want to have two bad results. We lost against Chelsea and then the next match we had a little extra to try to win.”Chelsea lost this weekend, so for sure they’re going to give more in their next match. I think its something every team has.”last_img read more

ODPEM Ready for 2018 Hurricane Season – Major Davis

first_img Speaking in an interview with JIS NEWS, Director General of ODPEM, Major Clive Davis, said that the agency is “exceptionally prepared” having made the necessary adjustments based on lessons from last season. The Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management (ODPEM) says that “all critical checks and balances” have been put in place to ensure that the island is in a state-of-readiness for the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season. Story Highlights Alberto, the first named storm of 2018, developed on May 25 bringing heavy rainfall and flash floods to parts of Mexico, Cuba, Florida and the eastern United States Gulf Coast and beyond. The Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management (ODPEM) says that “all critical checks and balances” have been put in place to ensure that the island is in a state-of-readiness for the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season.The forecast from the Meteorological Office of Jamaica (Met Service) suggests that the season, from June 1 to November 30, will be above average.Alberto, the first named storm of 2018, developed on May 25 bringing heavy rainfall and flash floods to parts of Mexico, Cuba, Florida and the eastern United States Gulf Coast and beyond.Speaking in an interview with JIS NEWS, Director General of ODPEM, Major Clive Davis, said that the agency is “exceptionally prepared” having made the necessary adjustments based on lessons from last season.“We have constantly been improving and strengthening our programme. There have been a number of consultations with local authorities, who have critical roles to play and we have made our checks to ensure that supplies and shelters are ready and sufficient,” said Major Davis.He noted that the necessary communication is being carried out to ensure that the facilities designated as shelters are not only ready and available, but that the local populace is aware of their location and shelter managers are accessible.“There have been some allocations made for contingency funds to be put in place for the purpose of emergency response, which also helps to bolster our overall readiness for the season,” he indicated.Major Davis is imploring all Jamaicans to be vigilant during the season, paying attention to bulletins being issued and to have supplies ready.“We also encourage individuals, especially those in low lying areas, to heed evacuation orders if issued and to be aware of where the nearest shelters are,” he said.Major Davis advised that irrespective of how active or inactive a hurricane season may be, it takes only one organised system to cause damage and as such, persons are reminded not to leave anything to chance.last_img read more

BC First Nation files Aboriginal Rights lawsuit against Canada over salmon farms

first_imgKingcome Inlet Fish Farm. Photo Courtesy: Dzawada’enuxw First NationLaurie HamelinAPTN NewsThe Dzawada’enuxw First Nation of Kingcome is taking legal action against Canada to remove 10 salmon farms from their traditional waters located in the Broughton Archipelago northeast of Vancouver Island.“We are standing up to say we are taking back our lands, territories and resources, said Traditional Leader Willie Moon of Dzawada’enuxw First Nation (DFN).“I know how the government works, they divide and conquer our elected and our traditional [leadership], but today we stand united with our elected moving forward for our people and our children.”The community has said no to open-net fish farms for 30 years.The statement of claim, filed in federal court argues that the federal government authorized fish farm licenses without their consultation or consent.The claim also says fish farm operations pollute and poison wild salmon.The Dzawada’enuxw believe that open-net pens pose a serious threat to already low salmon stocks and have been actively protesting against the industry for three years.(Members of Dzawada’enuxw First Nation and supporters gather in downtown Vancouver. Photo Courtesy: Rob Smith/APTN)DFN members occupied Midsummer Island fish farm, owned by Marine Harvest Canada, but were ordered off in December 2017 by a court injunction.Jack Woodward, the nation’s lawyer, represented the Tsilhqot’in in their landmark title and rights case.“This is an action against Canada to terminate the federal licences which authorize fish farms,” said Woodward.“The legal basis of the case is that these federal licences infringe upon my client’s constitutionally-protected Aboriginal Rights.”This lawsuit is the third court challenge the DFN has filed since last year.“A win on any one of these cases could end fish farm licences for Atlantic salmon on the B.C. coast,” said Woodward.Last month the B.C. government announced a plan to phase out some fish farms in the Broughton Archipelago, but it did not include DFN.The Dzawada’enuxw left the government-to-government talks early last year.Although DFN believes the new deal between three other First Nations and the Province made some progress in protecting wild salmon from fish farms, they fear critical gaps remain.Chief Moon said DFN is taking matters into their owns hands, “Our membership said zero tolerance.”“Get those fish farms out of the water!”[email protected]@laurie_hamelinlast_img read more