High Court Skeptical That Biotech Firm Can Patent Human Genes

first_img This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. High Court Skeptical That Biotech Firm Can Patent Human Genes Supreme Court justices seemed to express skepticism Monday that a biotech company can patent human genes isolated from the body that signal a greater likelihood of ovarian or breast cancer. The biotech industry has warned that a broad ruling against such patents could endanger billions of dollars in investment.Los Angeles Times: Supreme Court Seems Opposed To Granting Patents On Human GenesThe Supreme Court took up a deceptively simple question in a case brought by breast cancer patients and medical researchers: Are human genes patentable? The answer appeared to be “no” during Monday’s oral arguments. The justices signaled that they probably will bar any grants of exclusive and profitable patents on human genes that prevent other scientists from testing these pieces of DNA (Savage and Terhune, 4/16).The Wall Street Journal: Justices Wary On Gene PatentsMonday arguments underscored the difficulty of distinguishing between those innovations that can be protected and scientifically significant discoveries that may not be eligible for patents — even ones that seek to unlock the mystery of the human genome (Bravin, 4/16).Reuters: Justices Wary Of Wide Human Gene Patent RulingThe Supreme Court justices on Monday signaled reluctance to issue too broad a ruling about patents on human genes, and some indicated they might seek a compromise distinguishing between types of genetic material. The biotechnology industry has warned that an expansive ruling against Myriad Genetics Inc could threaten billions of dollars of investment (Hurley, 4/15).Politico: SCOTUS Case: Can Genes Be Patented?Several Supreme Court justices seemed sympathetic to claims that genes themselves do not warrant patent protection during arguments Monday in a landmark intellectual property case that could determine whether genes should be in the public domain. But during the arguments in Association for Molecular Pathology, et al. v. Myriad Genetics, the justices repeatedly took refuge in metaphors of baseball bats and chocolate-chip cookies rather than the hard science of DNA (Norman, 4/15).Philadelphia Inquirer: A Patent On A Gene Stirs High-Court MusingsMolecules and chocolate-chip cookies, baseball bats, and Amazonian tree sap were all part of a spirited Supreme Court discussion Monday as the nine justices wrestled with the question of whether one should be able to get a patent for a human gene. If you slice up pieces of microscopic molecules, have you created new ones or just separated existing body parts, not unlike kidneys or livers, which are products of nature and not usually granted patents? And, more important in this matter, can you profit by preventing others from researching those molecules or providing lower-cost testing services? The justices seemed to be looking for a compromise in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics Inc. AMP was part of the original group of plaintiffs that represented researchers, including two from the University of Pennsylvania, patient groups, and six women, including one from Williamsport, Pa., with breast or ovarian cancer or a family history of either (Sell, 4/16).Medpage Today: Gene Patents Spark Debate In High CourtSupreme Court justices lobbed hard questions Monday about whether a company could patent isolated human genes in a case that looms large in the personalized medicine arena. During arguments before the court, several justices expressed doubt that Myriad Genetics could rightfully patent segments of human genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, genes in which mutations are indications of increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Products of nature aren’t patentable. Only inventions are, but Salt Lake City-based Myriad argued that because the genes have been isolated from the body, they are no longer a product of nature and can be patented (Pittman, 4/15).In the meantime, drugmakers are using an interpretation of safety laws to block generic versions of their drugs –The New York Times: Drug Makers Use Safety Rule To Block GenericsFor decades, pharmaceutical companies have deployed an array of tactics aimed at preventing low-cost copies of their drugs from entering the marketplace. But federal regulators contend the latest strategy — which relies on a creative interpretation of drug safety laws — is illegal. The Federal Trade Commission recently weighed in on a legal case over the tactic involving the drug maker Actelion, and earlier this month a federal suit was filed in another case in Florida (Thomas, 4/15).In other drug industry news –The Wall Street Journal: High Court Rejects Glaxo Appeal In Avandia CaseThe U.S. Supreme Court on Monday cleared the way for health insurer Humana Inc. to sue GlaxoSmithKline for the recovery of health care expenses on some patients who were allegedly harmed by diabetes drug Avandia. The high court, in a short written order, said it wouldn’t consider a Glaxo appeal of a lower-court ruling that allowed the Humana lawsuit to proceed (Kendall, 4/15).Politico: Meningitis Deaths Fuel A Renewed FDA DebateFood and Drug Administration Commissioner Margaret Hamburg will be on the hot seat Tuesday as she tries to defend the agency’s failure to stop a fungal meningitis outbreak last year that killed more than 50 people. The episode mostly fell from the headlines as the deaths tapered off but is roaring back with the hearing on the Hill. Many Democrats in Congress want to give the FDA more authority to regulate compounding pharmacies like the one linked to this outbreak. But some Republicans question whether the agency failed to properly use the authority it already had, and the key House panel didn’t put the issue on its list of legislative priorities for the year (Norman, 4/15).last_img read more

HHS Unveils Medicare Claims Data Detailing Hospital Price Information For Outpatient Treatment

first_imgThe average charges for 30 hospital outpatient procedures show big hospital-to-hospital variation in terms of how much the facilities bill patients for the same service.Politico: HHS Releases Prices For Outpatient TreatmentThe Obama administration expanded its efforts to shine the light on hospital pricing Monday, making public charges for outpatient services from its vast trove of Medicare claims. It follows a move last month to publicize the often wild variation in charges for the 100 most common inpatient procedures. Experts say it’s part of a long-delayed transition to price transparency for an industry that’s been largely protected from it in the past (Norman, 6/4).Kaiser Health News: Capsules: Medicare Data Show Wide Divide In Outpatient Hospital BillsMedicare released average bill charges for 30 hospital outpatient procedures Monday, showing big differences from hospital to hospital in how much they bill patients for the same service. The data come a month after the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services garnered front-page attention for its release of similar information about 100 common hospital inpatient procedures (Rau, 6/3).CQ HealthBeat: Medicare Outpatient Costs Vary Widely, HHS Data ShowsVermont, Maine and North Dakota have the highest per capita outpatient costs under new Medicare data released by federal health officials Monday. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius released the cache of records at the fourth annual national health conference Health Datapalooza (Adams, 6/3).Medpage Today: CMS Releases More Hospital Pricing DataThe agency also released information on Medicare spending and utilization at the county, state, and hospital-referral region and the prevalence of certain chronic conditions among Medicare beneficiaries. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) officials hope the additional publicly available data will help spur wiser decisions by consumers and provide researchers with better understanding of Medicare spending and utilization in more localized areas (Pittman, 6/3). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. HHS Unveils Medicare Claims Data Detailing Hospital Price Information For Outpatient Treatmentlast_img read more

First Edition April 16 2014

first_imgToday’s headlines include a report detailing how changes in the Census Bureau’s annual survey could mask the health law’s impact.   Kaiser Health News: FAQ On ACOs: Accountable Care Organizations, ExplainedKaiser Health News staff writer Jenny Gold writes: “One of the main ways the Affordable Care Act seeks to reduce health care costs is by encouraging doctors, hospitals and other health care providers to form networks which coordinate patient care and become eligible for bonuses when they deliver care more efficiently. … While ACOs are touted as a way to help fix an inefficient payment system that rewards more, not better, care, some economists warn they could lead to greater consolidation in the health care industry, which could allow some providers to charge more if they’re the only game in town. Here are answers to some of the more common questions about how they work” (Gold, 4/16). Read the story.Kaiser Health News: Capsules: Health Law Push Brings Thousands Into Colo. Medicaid Who Were Already EligibleNow on Kaiser Health News’ blog, Eric Whitney writes: “The big marketing push to get people enrolled in health coverage between October and March resulted in 3 million people signing up for Medicaid. Hundreds of thousands of those people were already eligible and could have signed up even before the Affordable Care Act made it much more generous” (Whitney, 4/16). Check out what else is on the blog.The New York Times: Census Survey Revisions Mask Health Law EffectsThe Census Bureau, the authoritative source of health insurance data for more than three decades, is changing its annual survey so thoroughly that it will be difficult to measure the effects of President Obama’s health care law in the next report, due this fall, census officials said. The changes are intended to improve the accuracy of the survey, being conducted this month in interviews with tens of thousands of households around the country. But the new questions are so different that the findings will not be comparable, the officials said (Pear, 4/15).Politico: Insurers See Brighter Obamacare SkiesHealth insurers got their first taste of Obamacare this year. And they want seconds. Insurers saw disaster in the fall when Obamacare’s rollout flopped and HealthCare.gov was a mess. But a strong March enrollment surge, along with indications that younger and healthier people had begun signing up, has changed their attitude. Around the country, insurers are considering expanding their stake in the Obamacare exchanges next year, bringing their business to more states and counties. Some health plans that skipped the new marketplaces altogether this year are ready to dive in next year (Cheney and Norman, 4/15).The Wall Street Journal: Obama Administration Won’t Extend Health-Insurance EnrollmentThe Obama administration said on Tuesday that a midnight deadline for most people to finish health-insurance applications for private coverage this year wouldn’t be extended amid signs that enrollment waits had dissipated. Aaron Albright, a spokesman for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, confirmed there would be no further changes to an extension that pushed the end of insurance enrollment until April 15 for those who were “in line” on HealthCare.gov by March 31. The federally run site is the main portal for buying insurance under the Affordable Care Act (Radnofsky, 4/15).Los Angeles Times: Health Sign-Ups In State Draw to A CloseAfter website troubles sparked a two-week extension, California officials wrapped up the first open enrollment for Obamacare coverage with nearly 1.3 million consumers signed up since October for the state-run exchange. Sign-ups ahead of Tuesday’s enrollment deadline appeared to run more smoothly than they did March 31, the previous cut-off date (Terhune, 4/15).NPR: Is Obamacare A Success? We Might Not Know For A WhileAfter months of focusing on how many people have or haven’t signed up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, we now have a rough total (7.5 million) and everyone’s keen to get to the bigger questions: How well is the law working? How many of those who signed up have paid their premiums and are actually getting coverage? How many were uninsured before they signed up? And just how big has the drop been in the number of uninsured people? (Rovner, 4/16).Politico: Poll: Uninsured Drops In Key StatesStates that have expanded Medicaid and opened their own exchanges have seen a higher rate of decline in the number of uninsured, compared with other states, a new poll show. The 21 states and D.C., which have done both, saw an average decline in uninsured of 2.5 percent, according to a poll released Wednesday by Gallup. The other 29 states that didn’t enact both measure had a dip in uninsured of less than 1 percent on average (McCalmont, 4/16).The Associated Press: Va. House Republicans Reaffirm Medicaid OppositionHouse Republicans say they remain resolute in their opposition to using federal Medicaid funds to provide health insurance to as many as 400,000 low-income Virginians. During a conference call with reporters Tuesday, House Speaker William J. Howell said he is optimistic that Gov. Terry McAuliffe and Democratic lawmakers would back down from their support of a proposed state budget that includes expanding Medicaid eligibility. State services could shutter if a state budget isn’t passed by July 1 (4/15).Politico: Giving Anti-Obamacare Speeches To EnrolleesThe two-week recess is the first extended break from Washington for lawmakers since the 2014 open enrollment season ended and coverage for many Americans kicked in. Many people with new plans received subsidies to make their health insurance more affordable, or they became eligible for expanded Medicaid. It’s not that red-state representatives and senators won’t come across negative stories about the Affordable Care Act from constituents who say the law caused their plans to be canceled, forced them to change doctors or raised costs for their businesses. It’s that other group, comprising the people being helped, that potentially poses a challenge (Cunningham and Kim, 4/16).Los Angeles Times: Louisiana Democrat Highlights Independence From Obama In New AdThe aggressive tone of Landrieu’s new ad mirrors that of her first ad last fall, which highlighted her legislative proposal to fix Obama’s healthcare law. Her campaign aired the ad after thousands of Louisiana residents received warnings that their health insurance policies would be canceled because they did not meet the new guidelines under the law. As a key target in the Republican quest to win back the Senate, Landrieu faces two Republican opponents in the November election and must win more than 50% of the vote to avoid a runoff (Reston, 4/15).The Wall Street Journal: Health Law Poses A Test In New Hampshire Senate RaceNew Hampshire’s rollout of the Affordable Care Act has been one of the rockiest in the nation, putting Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen on the front lines of Republican efforts to make the 2014 elections a referendum on the health law. Only a single insurer in the state offers policies through the new law. Ten of the state’s 26 hospitals and one fifth of its primary care providers aren’t in its network. Residents of Concord, the state capital, have to drive to other cities to get covered hospital care (Hook, 4/15).The Washington Post: Scientists Embark On Unprecedented Effort To Connect Millions Of Patient Medical RecordsInside an otherwise ordinary office building in lower Manhattan, government-funded scientists have begun collecting and connecting together terabytes of patient medical records in what may be one of the most radical projects in health care ever attempted. The data — from every patient treated at one of New York’s major hospital centers over the past few years — include some of the most intimate details of a life. Vital signs. Diagnoses and conditions. Results of blood tests, X-rays, MRI scans. Surgeries. Insurance claims. And in some cases, links to genetic samples (Cha, 4/15).USA Today: Doctors, Medical Staff On Drugs Put Patients At RiskAmerica’s prescription drug epidemic reaches deep into the medical community. Across the country, more than 100,000 doctors, nurses, technicians and other health professionals struggle with abuse or addiction, mostly involving narcotics such as oxycodone and fentanyl. Their knowledge and access make their problems especially hard to detect. Yet the risks they pose — to the public and to themselves — are enormous. A single addicted health care worker who resorts to “drug diversion,” the official term for stealing drugs, can endanger thousands (Eisler, 4/15).Los Angeles Times: Supreme Court to Consider Challenge To Law Barring Campaign FalsehoodsThe Supreme Court next week will consider for the first time whether states may enforce laws that make it a crime to knowingly publish false statements about political candidates. The justices will hear an antiabortion group’s free-speech challenge to an Ohio law that was invoked in 2010 by then-Rep. Steve Driehaus, a Democrat. He had voted for President Obama’s healthcare law and was facing a tough race for reelection. The antiabortion group Susan B. Anthony List launched a campaign to unseat Driehaus, preparing to run billboard ads saying, “Shame on Steve Driehaus! Driehaus voted for taxpayer-funded abortion.” The statement was false, Driehaus said, since under the law no federal funds can be spent to pay for abortions (Savage, 4/15).The Associated Press: Court To Weigh Challenge To Ban On Campaign LiesThe Ohio law makes it illegal to knowingly or recklessly make false statements about a candidate during an election. The high court is not expected to rule directly on the constitutional issue, instead focusing on the narrower question of whether the law can be challenged before it is actually enforced. The outcome could affect similar laws in at least 15 states. The case began during the 2010 election, when the Susan B. Anthony List, an anti-abortion group, planned to launch a billboard campaign accusing then-Democratic Rep. Steven Driehaus of supporting taxpayer-funded abortion because he backed President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul (4/16).The New York Times: Arizona: Law Signed To Allow Surprise Inspections At Abortion ClinicsGov. Jan Brewer on Tuesday signed a bill allowing health inspectors to carry out surprise inspections on abortion clinics without having to get a court-approved warrant (Santos, 4/15).The Washington Post: Gansler Takes Aim At Maryland’s ‘Bad Spending Habits,’ Says He Would Save The State MoneyGansler said major savings could be realized through reforms to the state’s procurement process, better management of the state Medicaid program and reduction of the non-violent prison population, among other strategies (Wagner, 4/15).The Washington Post: Massachusetts Cannot Ban FDA-Approved Painkiller, Judge RulesA federal judge on Tuesday blocked an effort by Massachusetts Gov. Deval L. Patrick to ban sales of a controversial new painkiller in the state, saying the governor’s move was preempted by federal law and could harm people who need the drug for pain relief. In a five-page order, U.S. District Judge Rya W. Zobel sided with the drug’s California-based manufacturer, Zogenix, which had argued that Patrick had no right to bar a medication that the Food and Drug Administration has deemed safe and effective (Dennis, 4/15).The Wall Street Journal: Detroit Reaches Deal With Police, Firefighter RetireesOther terms in Tuesday’s police and firefighters pact include a voluntary employee beneficiary association plan, known as a VEBA, funded by Detroit to handle retiree health care, instead of the city. These retirees would also keep some representation on the board of their pension system, over which the city had proposed increasing independent oversight. All of the city’s creditors will still have a chance to vote on the city’s plan, including more than 20,000 city workers and retirees. But Judge Rhodes will have the final say on its approval (Dolan, 4/15).Check out all of Kaiser Health News’ e-mail options including First Edition and Breaking News alerts on our Subscriptions page. First Edition: April 16, 2014 This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

WatchFrustrated Canada demands US help fix China crisis brought on by Huawei

first_imgU.S. negotiators have rejected Chinese proposals to include the Huawei issue in their current trade deal discussions, according to a source familiar with the negotiations.Canada’s U.S. ambassador David MacNaughton, who noted Canada has assisted the current U.S. administration on diplomatic efforts with Venezuela, Latvia and NATO, strongly suggested future requests for aid would not be met so positively unless Washington cooperated more.“How do you go to canola farmers and relatives of the two (Canadian detainees) and say ‘Well, actually, notwithstanding all of this, we’re going to try and do whatever we can to help?’” he said.“It makes it much more difficult in public opinion terms for the prime minister to have permission to do some of the things that would be in both countries’ interests.”MacNaughton, who has cabinet-level status in Trudeau’s government, played a key role in negotiating a new North American trade deal last year.Relations between Trump and Trudeau are formal at best. Officials in Ottawa have not forgotten that the president blew up last year’s Group of Seven summit in Canada by describing Trudeau as very dishonest and weak.“At the political level, this administration doesn’t like us very much,” said a second well-placed source.Intertwined with the China crisis is a second problem: the tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum that Trump imposed last year on national security grounds.Meng, who is under house arrest at her Vancouver mansion, next appears in court on May 8 ahead of an extradition hearing, in a process that could take years.MacNaughton said part of Canada’s frustration also stems from a lack of information on U.S. intentions toward Meng. Trump has previously suggested the charges against her could be dropped if that would help the trade talks.“What we’ve said is, ‘We’d like to have a little better sense of what your plans are in terms of dealing with her. Are you engaged in negotiations over a plea deal?’,” he said. “We’re completely in the dark.”© Thomson Reuters 2019 Join the conversation → OTTAWA — Canada is leaning on the United States to help settle a dispute with China, which has started to block imports of vital Canadian commodities amid a dispute over a detained Huawei executive.In a sign of increasing frustration at what it sees as a lacklustre U.S. response, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government is signalling it could withhold cooperation on major issues.China has upped the pressure on Canada in recent weeks over the arrest of Huawei Technologies Co Ltd Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, arrested last December on a U.S. warrant. It halted Canadian canola imports and last week suspended the permits of two major pork producers.After Meng’s Vancouver arrest, Chinese police also detained two Canadian citizens. First canola, now pigs: China blocks imports from two Canadian pork producers amid diplomatic row Help on way for canola farmers, but no ‘simple answer’ when it comes to replacing Chinese demand It’s not just canola: China imposing unusual obstacles on Canadian soybean, pea and pork exports Beijing is refusing to allow a Canadian trade delegation to visit, forcing officials to use video conference calls as they try to negate a major threat to commodity exports.With no cards to play against China without risking significant economic damage, Canada has launched a full-court press in Washington, which is negotiating its own trade deal with Beijing.The results have been meagre.“It’s a very challenging situation. When we raise it with the Americans they just say, ‘Dealing with the Chinese is tough’,” said a Canadian government source.At the political level, this administration doesn’t like us very much Email First canola, now pigs: China blocks imports from two Canadian pork producers amid diplomatic row Facebook “It’s also not clear who we should be targeting since you never know who is up and who is down in the administration at any given point,” said the source, who requested anonymity given the sensitivity of the matter.Among those the Canadians approached are Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Republican Senator Jim Risch, chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee.The State Department said it was “concerned” by the canola ban. In March, the Foreign Relations Committee responded to Canada’s concerns by passing a bipartisan resolution supporting the country.Canada says the United States is obliged to help, given that the U.S. arrest warrant triggered the crisis with Beijing.The arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou triggered the crisis with China. Reuters With two tweets, Trump shatters historic calm in global markets Twitter May 6, 20199:20 AM EDT Filed under News Economy More Related Stories Comments Share this storyFrustrated Canada demands U.S. help fix China crisis brought on by Huawei arrest — or else Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Frustrated Canada demands U.S. help fix China crisis brought on by Huawei arrest — or else With no cards to play against China, Canada has launched a full-court press in Washington — with meagre results Comment Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press files Andrew Scheer demands Canada pull funds from Chinese development bank in retaliation for canola ban Reddit David Ljunggren last_img read more

Electrek review The Jetson Bolt electric bicycle is a 399 steal of

first_imgSource: Charge Forward One of the things I love about electric bicycles is the extreme variety of options in the market. From electric cargo bikes to mini e-bikes to $10,000 street e-bikes, there’s a bit of everything on the spectrum.And like any spectrum, you often find the really interesting stuff on the extreme ends. Cue the Jetson Bolt, an ultra-affordable $399 electric bicycle. This little thing is a surprisingly capable bike, as I found out by riding it around for a few weeks. Read on to see my full review. more…The post Electrek review: The Jetson Bolt electric bicycle is a $399 steal of a deal appeared first on Electrek.last_img

Infinitum Electric secures 18 million in funding for efficient HVAC motor technology

first_imgInfinitum Electric, a developer of electric motors, has closed a $1.8 million Series A financing round, bringing its total funding to $2.7 million. The company says it will use the funding to launch an HVAC-specific, fully-integrated motor and increase research and development efforts for applications in the EVs and Oil and Gas markets.Infinitum credits its printed circuit board (PCB) stator technology for electric motors with efficiency above IE5, the industry’s highest efficiency class. The company works with motor and generator manufacturers to customize its technology for specific applications.“Our patented circuit board stator is what sets us apart and positions us well for success,” said Infinitum CEO Ben Schuler. “The electric motor market is a $150 billion industry annually and many markets within the industry are trying to consume and create power more efficiently. Some markets, like EVs, are in the process of electrifying completely.” Source: Infinitum Electric Source: Electric Vehicles Magazinelast_img read more

Florida State University Transitions To 100 Electric Bus Fleet

first_img Proterra Scores $155 Million In Latest Investment Round Led By Daimler Source: Electric Vehicle News Proterra Enters Hawaiian Islands With Electric Buses Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 17, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Florida State University is going all-electric with a fleet of 27 EV busesProterra announced that StarMetro, the city of Tallahassee’s public transit system, placed its third order for electric buses.The deal is for 22 35-foot Proterra Catalyst FC (fast charge, short range) buses for Florida State University (FSU), which already has 5 electric buses.Proterra news Proterra Teams With Thomas Built For Electric Schools Buses The buses will be delivered in two steps – initial deployment of 15 buses is scheduled for mid-2019, while the remaining 7 buses are to be deployed in 2021. Once deliveries are completed, FSU will complete transitions to 100% zero-emission university bus fleet.According to the press release, electrification will bring more than $10 million in savings on fuel and maintenance.“FSU is one of the first universities in the nation to decommission its entire fossil-fuel powered fleet and upgrade it to a 100 percent battery-electric fleet, joining cities across North America in the trend to cleaner, higher-performing electric transit buses.The procurement will also set a national precedent with FSU being one of the first universities in the nation to go all-electric, and StarMetro will continue to lead the Sunshine State in electric bus adoption.”“The new 35-foot Proterra Catalyst FC buses will serve FSU’s Seminole Express Bus Service and provide campus transportation for faculty, staff, students and visitors, totaling an average ridership of 847,000 each year. Operations are expected to begin mid-2019 with an initial deployment of 15 buses, with the remaining seven buses expected to deploy in 2021. This procurement also supports the goals defined in Florida State University’s strategic plan to deepen its commitment to continuous innovation, invest strategically and incorporate sustainable living practices into all FSU activities. With 22 Catalyst buses, Florida State University will displace more than 2,820,000 gallons of diesel over the vehicles’ 12-year lifespan and eliminate over 5,000,000 pounds of carbon emissions annually. The new electric buses will also provide fuel and maintenance cost savings of more than $10 million.For universities and colleges, the trajectory towards sustainable transportation models is not only fueled by widespread student interest in environmentally friendly practices, but also because “going green” can provide long-term cost savings. As the third largest university in Florida, FSU will serve as a leading example for other colleges across the country that want to prioritize zero-emission campus transportation for the next generation. Proterra has also sold its Catalyst buses to the University of Montana, Duke University and Alabama A&M University.”Ryan Popple, CEO of Proterra said:“As university populations grow across the United States, more campus transportation operators are taking the long-view and looking for sustainable ways to increase mobility while reducing costs and their carbon footprint. Helping universities and the next-generation of leaders experience zero-emission transit is intrinsic to our vision.”last_img read more

Paris fights smog with biggest ever EU electric bus purchase 800 ebuses

first_imgParis’ public transport operator announced it has ordered up to 800 new electric buses for the capital city, replacing older diesel buses in the process. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xVp0Cr2Pg4gThe post Paris fights smog with biggest ever EU electric bus purchase, 800 e-buses to replace diesel appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

BMW completing project to install 100 EV charging stations at US national

first_imgSource: Charge Forward BMW says that it’s now on the verge of completing a project it announced a little more than two years ago — installing 100 EV chargers at US national parks. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post BMW completing project to install 100 EV charging stations at US national parks appeared first on Electrek.last_img

Englands future stars 20 to watch

first_imgWed 12 Nov 2008 19.01 EST Facebook Share | Pick Share on LinkedIn 13 Nov 2008 17:26 Share on Facebook Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Shares1313 Guardian writers Arsenal’s Jack Wilshere is one of a healthy number of talented English teenagers tipped to be future stars of the Premier League. Photograph: Glyn Kirk/AFP/Getty Images It’s always the same teams, isn’t it? Even if Leeds are relegated to the Third Division. I expect that says a lot about the contacts of the “Guardian writers” (can’t be Barry, can it? He would disdain such a piece).I doubt we’ll hear of more than two or three of these lads in five years’ time. | Pick … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Facebook Reply Arsenal have some awsum youngsters, as seen last night. the thing you have to remeber is that the first team dosent win anything. so when they progress into the first team they dont pick up the winning mentallity.manU youngsers will almost certainly win more then arsenals. look at Cesc. cesc is a player whgo should be on a level with messi, ronaldo, rooney, however because he is being played in a team where too much is expected from him – because they lack any senior player or leader in midfield, he has not really pushed on or developed in the last year. he started last season exceptionally, but this season dosent look as good. if you consider spain at the euros, cesc played a further forward role, allowing his passing to be in the final third. at arse this season he has had to play alot deeper, being less effective, looks like he enjoying it less. the great arsene wenger is actually starting to hold his players back by being to stuborn to his principles. his young players will not develop the winning mentallity, because their not winning.the other worry is that that arsenal could become a PSV/Ajax style feeder club if they dont win things soon, developing great players who leave to seek reward.even with players such as ramsey coming throu it is very hard to see where arsenal will win things, the team lacks spine and wengers not willing to do anything about it, so when ramsey comes through it is into a frustrated team, not a winning one.wenger is a muppet for not buying alonso in the summer. full stop. 18mil would have been a bargain, he would have suited arsenals style perfectly, worked wonders alongside cesc, allowed him to get forward and control the game, and given abit of maturilty in midfield.no doubt wilshire, ramsey, vella, merida etc will be outstanding players, but the de silva twins etc at man u will win more, and ultimately be more succesfulvella, merida, cesc will all end up at madrid or barcabut what the hell is benitez doing with Ngog???? Nemeth to rule the world! Share on Twitter Report 4 Share on Messenger Share 13 Nov 2008 11:48 Reply Facebook Report Reply Share Share on Twitter Share Order by oldest slightly tweaking the topic, i know, but the best up-and-coming british footballer is surely mr aaron ramsey, a sublime talent and – dare i say (yes i do) – the welsh zidane: supreme balance, wonderful vision, wiry strength, two feet, awesome close control…. arsenal can look forward to selling fabregas for €50m in 2 years time, knowing they have the replacement coming gently to the boil Show 25 PrivateDic Facebook 13 Nov 2008 16:51 | Pick Share on Facebook collapsed expanded Reply recommendations PollittPerfectRecord Share pierrelemer Share on Twitter 0 1 Facebook 13 Nov 2008 8:58 The writers forgot about Ryan Tunnicliffe the ManU player and Benik Afobe from Arse. Tunnicliffe is still 15 and is playing on the u17’s with Wilshere, Bostock and Shelvey. Afobe is going to make it into the first team for sure.Ram, Mark Randall of Arsenal can be a better version of Carrick IMO. 13 Nov 2008 17:23 Reply Sportblog Share on Twitter hdtvdaly Facebook Report | Pick Share on Twitter Report Share on Facebook Reply Soccer 13 Nov 2008 13:54 Share on Facebook 3 Share on Facebook Twitter Twitter 100 0 1 Facebook 0 1 First published on Wed 12 Nov 2008 19.01 EST Reply Report Twitter Share on Facebook | Pick Share Jose Baxter, 16EvertonStrikerSaid to be better than Wayne Rooney at 14. Bootle-born, he left school last summer and joined the Everton first-team squad that toured Switzerland and the US. Made his competitive senior debut with a substitute appearance at home to Blackburn in August, becoming Everton’s youngest first-team player.Mark Beevers, 18Sheffield WednesdayDefenderLast season’s supporters’ player of the year at Hillsborough, the centre-half has signed a contract to keep him at Wednesday until 2012. He stands 6ft 4in tall, is deceptively quick across the turf and strong in the air, and has already attracted interest from Premier League clubs.John Bostock, 16Tottenham HotspurMidfielderCrystal Palace’s youngest player when he made his debut at 15 years 287 days last season before his controversial summer move to Spurs for an initial £700,000. Tall, elegant and visionary, the attacking midfielder became Tottenham’s youngest player, at 16 years 295 days, against Dinamo Zagreb.Nathan Delfouneso, 17Aston VillaStrikerThe 6ft 1in Birmingham-born striker made his first-team debut earlier this season in the Uefa Cup against Hafnarfjorour and scored a hat-trick on his first appearance for the England Under-17s in October 2007. A regular in reserve and academy sides, for whom he has been a prolific scorer.Fabian Delph, 18Leeds UnitedMidfielderKen Bates laughed off Newcastle United’s £1m bid for a dynamic talent currently not only making his mark in League One but who has just broken into Stuart Pearce’s England Under-21 squad. Arsenal and Manchester United are also seriously interested, but his value has risen closer to £6m. Daniel Drinkwater, 18Manchester UnitedMidfielderTwo-footed and boasting a fine passing range, Drinkwater has been with the club since he was nine. The young Mancunian’s progress was hindered by injury last year, but he remains highly regarded and is an England Under-19 international who looks likely to grace the Premier League.Jordan Henderson, 18SunderlandMidfielderAn elusive right-sided midfielder or deep-lying forward, and equally happy in the hole or drifting wide right, the Wearside-born Henderson caught the eye of England’s leading clubs during Sunderland’s run to the FA Youth Cup semi-finals last season. He made his first senior start against Blackburn last night. Gavin Hoyte, 18ArsenalDefenderYounger brother of the former Arsenal full-back, Justin, the defender joined the club at nine and has proved quick, athletic and astute both at right-back and centre-half. A regular with the England Under-19s and in Arsène Wenger’s Carling Cup side that enjoyed wins over Sheffield United and Wigan.Henri Lansbury, 18ArsenalMidfielderStrongly built and powerful yet creative on the ball and a goal threat, the England Under-17 midfielder has been at Arsenal since he was nine and has recovered from the glandular fever that frustrated his progress in the second half of last season to feature in the Carling Cup this term.Josh McEachran, 15ChelseaMidfielderA skilful left-footed midfielder whom Chelsea have retained despite persistent interest from Manchester United. He can play on the left or right and has already impressed Luiz Felipe Scolari at Stamford Bridge as he furthers his development in the youth sides. Has been captain of the England Under-16s.Jacob Mellis, 17ChelseaMidfielderThe England Under-19 international signed from Sheffield United in the summer of 2007 and has since been employed everywhere from attacking midfield – scoring twice against Liverpool reserves recently – to full-back and centre-half within the Chelsea academy set-up.Victor Moses, 17Crystal PalaceForwardBorn in Nigeria but resident in the UK since he was five, the graduate of Palace’s academy broke into the first-team last season and has since signeda four-year professional contract at Selhurst Park. Strong, skilful and quick, he has maintained his progress this term.Nile Ranger, 17Newcastle UnitedStrikerThe word among Newcastle United’s youth and reserve ranks is “Ranger is the danger”. The prolific striker, spirited north from Southampton’s youth set-up, has sat on the first team bench a few times already this season and is tipped for Shearer-esque scoring feats.Jack Rodwell, 17EvertonCentral defender/midfielderSenior debut came as a substitute against Alkmaar at the age of 16 years 284 days, making him the youngest ever Everton player to appear in Europe. A current Under-19 international often compared to Rio Ferdinand, he is strong, quick and assured. Has made eight first-team appearances this season.Freddie Sears, 18West Ham UnitedForward A run of 25 goals in 24 matches for the youths and reserves forced him into the first-team set-up last season, and it took the striker just five minutes and 16 seconds to score his first senior goal, the winner against Blackburn in March. He has featured regularly this term under Gianfranco Zola.Jonjo Shelvey, 16Charlton AthleticMidfielderThe club’s youngest player, debuting at 16 years 59 days against Barnsley in April, he had made his mark as a goalscoring midfielder in the youth and reserves set-up at the Valley. He captained the England Under-16s in their 2007 Victory Shield campaign, scoring three goals in as many games.Danny Welbeck, 17Manchester UnitedStrikerSkilful, strong and pacy with a prolific scoring record for the United junior sides. Sir Alex Ferguson likens the slightly unorthodox Welbeck to Portsmouth’s Nwankwo Kanu and has said “Danny has marvellous things about him.” An Under-19 international who has trained with the first team.Aidan White, 17Leeds UnitedDefenderThe full-back, who boasts a fine left foot and decent pace, made his debut earlier this season in the Carling Cup defeat of Crystal Palace and was given a standing ovation upon being substituted. He is now making regular appearances in the League One club’s first-team set-up. Jack Wilshere, 16ArsenalMidfielderEye-catching performances in the Carling Cup this season and Arsenal’s youngest league debutant, at 16 years 256 days, when he came on against Blackburn in September. He scored his first senior goal in the 6-0 rout of Sheffield United and had a fine game against Wigan on Tuesday.Michael Woods, 18ChelseaMidfielderPlucked from Leeds United’s academy, much to the Yorkshire club’s frustration, the England Under-18 international made his first-team debut at Chelsea in January 2007 at 16 years 275 days. Scolari called the defensive midfielder up for last night’s Carling Cup tie against Burnley at Stamford Bridge. Email (optional) 25 Looks like the makings of a potential world-cup winning team, right there. A true golden generation. Report Share on Twitter Share via Email Sportblog 0 1 Share on Facebook Reply Share via Email Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Lowfields 0 1 13 Nov 2008 11:07 Report The “big” teams are simply walking in a taking the best youngsters from the “smaller” teams. Tottenham got a huge talent in Bostock by taking him from Palace for a very small sum of money.Arsenal paid £5 million for Ramsey, yet Bostock who many believe is a much better player was had for less than a million. Spurs did nothing wrong, they acted within the crazy rules. The rules need to be tightened, otherwise the smaller clubs will do away with their youth academies and English football will suffer. Why bother investing in the talent when another club will bag a bargain whenever they feel like it? unthreaded Share Share on Facebook All Facebook offsideintahiti Share on Facebook 13 Nov 2008 13:30 route22 13 Nov 2008 11:30 Share | Pick 1 | Pick | Pick Facebook Share Share on Facebook | Pick Report Share on Facebook PS. How much does any Gooner want to bet that Wilshire, Hoyte and Lansbury aren’t playing their football at Arsenal by the time they’re 22?How many English players have had to leave Wenger’s squad just to get a game…? Steve Sidwell, David Bentley, Stuart Taylor, Jermaine Pennant, Matthew Upson, Justin Hoyte, Kerrea Gilbert… how many am I missing?Yeah, that Wenger has been just great for English football….. oh, look, another 16 year old from Togo! How many English players have had to leave Wenger’s squad just to get a game…? Steve Sidwell, David Bentley, Stuart Taylor, Jermaine Pennant, Matthew Upson, Justin Hoyte, Kerrea Gilbert… how many am I missing?The only one of them good enough to be in the Arsenal team now is Bentley. Bentley was allowed to leave because of his attitude, particularly how abysmally he behaved when on loan at Norwich.If they’re not good enough they shouldn’t be getting a game. A good way to boost the value of these young players! Is this piece funded by agents? Ramalution Twitter 0 1 50 Report 0 1 Twitter Soccer Reply Threads collapsed Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Reply Share Guardian writers pick their best 20 players in England who are 18 or under SFChapman Facebook Facebook Twitter Twitter route22 hungrymanjosh Loading comments… Trouble loading? Facebook Share on Twitter blogposts newest Share on Facebook Reply Twitter Facebook Report ItsGoingIrish Share on Facebook | Pick Reply Report I literally know none of these players-they could be part of the SBS for all I know.Could the guardian though make a distinction which are going to be say: ‘Michael Carrick’ good and are there any that could be ‘Maradonna’ good? pierrelemer 0 1 Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Facebook oldest Report Share Reply Facebook Reason (optional) Twitter Reply | Pick 1 Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Twitter 0 1center_img 13 Nov 2008 15:14 Since you’re here… PollittPerfectRecordNov 13 08, 2:20am (about 5 hours ago)It’s always the same teams, isn’t it? Even if Leeds are relegated to the Third Division. I expect that says a lot about the contacts of the “Guardian writers” (can’t be Barry, can it? He would disdain such a piece).The statement reflects more on your knowledge of academies than the Grauniad, who historically, notably tend to shy away from praising Leeds.What’s your point?As many that know about these things appreciate, Leeds have one of the very best academies in the country, and unlike some of the “bigger” clubs, genuinely encourage their youngsters rather than sign them to prevent others doing so. So does their inclusion come as a surprise?Alan Smith, Jon Woodgate, Micah Richards, Scott Carson, James Milner, Aaron Lennon, Paul Robinson, Harry Kewell, Ian Harte, plus as many again that are now plying their trade in the top two divisions started at Thorpe Arch, the superb facility set up by Howard wilkinson.Michael Woods was “plucked” by Chelsea alright. A substantial out of court settlement ensued.These lists are all fine and dandy but a couple of years ago might have featured any number of names who haven’t quite made the grade. The question would be “why” and I suspect that, as one or two older pro’s are starting to mumble, the youngsters aren’t worked hard enough, get too much financial inducement to remain with the bigger clubs and are never stretched in the way that they should be, retreating into what amounts to a comfort zone.Added to which, lads aren’t always going to grow to be fully formed players – many hit a ceiling and never fully develop as you would hope. I remember full well a Leeds youth side that beat MU in the youth cup – the MU kids included many who were part of the title winning side that so thrilled Alan Hansen shortly after whereas the Leeds team consisted of players who were international class at that age but mostly ended up in the lower divisions.A season ago you might have included Jonny Howson in this list. Two or threee seasons ago, there would’ve been a mention for Danny Rose and any number of Middlesbro’ youngsters. Support The Guardian johnny5eyes Share 13 Nov 2008 17:18 13 Nov 2008 17:32 | Pick Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other Report Reuse this content,View all comments > 13 Nov 2008 15:26 Baxter is a massive talent but this “better than Rooney at 14” stuff is rubbish. Rooney was simply the best youth player I have ever seen, he was so far ahead of kids his own age it was almost unfair. Whilst Baxter has the skill and technique he lacks the raw power of Rooney and plays in a more withdrawn role generally.Baxter goal: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70MSUhQBVI8Rodwell is playing in a midfield role for Everton at the moment but Moyes sees him as a centre back in the long term. He is very classy on the ball, good in the air and physically strong. He has been tipped to be a star for about the last 3 years.Other kids to watch out for are Ross Barkley and Hallam Hope who were the stars of our Milk Cup win earlier this year. Ross is a Gerrard-esque midfielder and Hope is a rangy striker.Incidentally in Evertons recent 3-2 win over Liverpool reserves 9 of our 11 players were from within 30 minutes of our ground whilst Liverpool had 2 from this country. This isn’t put solely to have a pop at Liverpool (after all they won the reserve league last year) but just to say it is sad that SO many players are imported at 16 from overseas. route22Nov 13 08, 3:48am (about 3 hours ago)”Any Keepers?”Joe Hart, Robert Green and Kirkland [who has been outstanding]Robert Green and Chris Kirkland are not exactly youngsters? I suspect many that bang on about Green are either Hammers supporters or don’t watch the bloke on a regular basis. He’s up there with Almunia and Gomes and never international class, whereas Kirkland has had a career blighted by injury, otherwise would have likely been a regular – I hope Ben Foster, whom you’ve omitted, manages to overcome his own setbacks to develop into the keeper he promises to be.Thjere’s also a damn good youth/U18 keeper at Leeds but in deference to other bloggers wishes, I won’t bore you further by mentioning him.. Twitter How is Shelvey in here, i saw him in the league cup and he wasn’t even good against lower league opposition. Wilshere is an amazing player, great left foot who could take over from Fabregas if he is eventually lured away by Barcelona. Share on Facebook 0 1 Reply Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp | Pick 13 Nov 2008 16:33 “Any Keepers?”Joe Hart, Robert Green and Kirkland [who has been outstanding] 3 0 1 Share on Twitter Facebook 13 Nov 2008 17:39 Topics 13 Nov 2008 11:33 Share Lowfields None of those Arsenal boys will ever come near Fabergas, when he is sold there will be no replacement, players of that quality come around once a generation and England has had it player of world quality for this generation and he retired because you wanted to play fat Frank with that big hacker of the ball Gerrard in the middle, well done. 0 1 kayakking Facebook 0 1 Share Timak – as bad as last night performance was, i was very excited to see Stephen Darby make his debut for liverpool, i didnt realise we had any young scousers in the squad, thought they were all from hungary… Facebook hungrymanjosh Share on Facebook comments (107)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share Twitter Twitter 0 1 13 Nov 2008 15:33 Reply kermitbantam Ramalution Share Twitter Share Twitter 0 1 KeithSimmonds Report Share on Pinterest I didnt think much of Rodwell in his first few games this season but he looked ok against Fulham. Its a big role for a young lad, it amazes me how Arsene Wenger is able to put the likes of Denilson or Fabregas into such an important role in central midfield from such a young age. I think Rodwell could be really good though. Not sure about Baxter mainly because his chances are going to be limited barring injuries. Everton are pretty strong in the strikers department with the Yak, Saha, Vic and Vaughan all ahead of Baxter. If he convinces the boss he should be ahead of any of those it will be a miracle. I take it the Guardian’s bizarre decision to restrict this list to English players means it doesn’t want any readers from Wales, Scotland or Ireland. Is the writer unaware of Wales’s record in youth-level football under Brian Flynn and the numerous youngsters, led by Ramsay, who look like making an impact at the top level? Or did he/she just decide to ignore them? 0 1 Report Reply 0 1 Report 13 Nov 2008 10:20 Share Facebook Facebook Share Share on Twitter | Pick | Pick Let’s build em up, then cut em down.It all looks very nice on paper, but……….. Reply | Pick Share on Facebook | Pick 0 1 Share on Facebook Twitter | Pick | Pick 0 1 Share on Facebook 0 1 Share on Twitter | Pick THEBIGBEE 13 Nov 2008 16:24 5 Report Facebook Reply Report Reply Twitter Any Keepers? Share on Twitter Lowfields Share on WhatsApp Share on Twitter | Pick Share Report 0 1 “Looks like the makings of a potential world-cup winning team, right there. A true golden generation.”I heard that somewhere before offside……now when was it? | Pick 13 Nov 2008 11:35 Reply 13 Nov 2008 17:49 Share Twitter 13 Nov 2008 17:42 Reply Share Facebook Reply Two points.The kneejerk cynicysm from people about a bunch of players most of them haven’t seen is depressing and rather pathetic.(although typical of these blogs…and in fact Britain as a whole).The Guardian neither knows or cares anything about football ouside the premiership (Leeds are still an ‘Honorary ‘ Prem side as someone has already mentioned). Facebook Thanks Pierrelemer for pointing out the obvious about Leeds… although Micah Richards, who played for Leeds City Boys, was never properly on our books.The fact that we’re mentioned here, Pollitt, is not because we’re a massive club – what are we, 45 places behind Chelsea? – but because we are consistently one of the best clubs at generating young talent and bringing it through to first-team level.Maybe only West Ham can rival our ability to develop players who don’t just make a professional debut, but go on to have a decent top-flight career.In 2001, in the semi-final of the Champions League, nine of the 18-man squad that faced Valencia were home-grown academy products – and all were full internationals. Liverpool have developed, what, two homegrown Premiership regulars in this century? Have Chelsea produced any?Even now in League One, Leeds have Fabian Delph, who will, barring injury, get 50 caps for England – whether at Elland Road or somewhere else. Aiden White will play in the Premiership and while Johnny Howson might not be at the same level, he is another Leeds lad who will have a good career in the game, as is Ben Parker.This is not an accident. It’s not because we’re a “big” club. It’s because Howard Wilkinson developed, starting the moment he joined in 1988, the most advanced youth set-up in the country. And it continues to bear fruit – even though we’re in the lower leagues now.And I for one would rather have a team of local lads busting their balls in the Championship/League One than the pack of Spanish/Senegalese/French/Cameroonian/Swedish mercanaries who got us relegated four years ago….. Share on Facebook Z34run Share on Twitter Report Twitter Report | Pick Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Report England’s future stars: 20 to watch Comments 107 Share on Facebook 5 Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Report | Pick 2 Share on Twitter “Leeds are still an ‘Honorary ‘ Prem side…”Thanks Johnny5eyes!Can we have an “honourary” £30 million in TV rights a season and an “honourary” bye into the FA Cup 3rd Round, then….???????Actually, no, can we have our 25 points returned to us…? That would be really honourable. Twitter Share Report | Pick Timak 0 1 Share Share on Twitter Share route22 Twitter Share on Facebook Reply 13 Nov 2008 10:22 13 Nov 2008 11:02 Twitter Report Share on Facebook 0 1 Share on Facebook Reply 0 1 Report 4 Twitter Share on Twitter Close report comment form 2 Twitter 0 1 13 Nov 2008 16:08 Twitter View more commentslast_img read more

Way Too Early 2020 Depth Chart June 2019

first_img Tags: depth charts K: Jake Moody (Jr.), Quinn Nordin (RS Sr.)P: Will Hart (RS Sr.) 1 0You need to login in order to vote QB: Dylan McCaffrey (RS Jr.), Joe Milton (RS So.), Cade McNamara (So.), J.D. Johnson (Fr.)RB: Zach Charbonnet (So.), Christian Turner (RS So.), Ben VanSumeren (RS So.), Hassan Haskins (RS So.)FB: Ben Mason (Sr.), Peter Bush (RS Sr.)WR1: Nico Collins (Sr.), Tarik Black (RS Jr.), Cornelius Johnson (So.), Quintel Kent (So.)WR2: Donovan Peoples-Jones (Sr.), Ronnie Bell (Jr.), A.J. Henning (Fr.)WR3: Mike Sainristil (So.), Giles Jackson (So.), George Johnson III (So.), Eamonn Dennis (Fr.)TE: Nick Eubanks (RS Sr.), Mustapha Muhammad (RS So.), Luke Schoonmaker (RS So.), Erick All (So.), Matt Hibner (Fr.), Nick Patterson (Fr.)LT: Jalen Mayfield (RS So.), Ryan Hayes (RS So.), Greg Robinson (RS Sr.), Trente Jones (So.), Jeffrey Persi (Fr.)LG: Chuck Filiaga (RS Jr.), Andrew Vastardis (RS Sr.), Zak Zinter (Fr.)C: Stephen Spanellis (RS Sr.), Nolan Rumler (So.), Jess Speight (RS Jr.), Reece Atteberry (Fr.)RG: Joel Honigford (RS Jr.), Zach Carpenter (So.), Micah Mazzccua (Fr.)RT: Andrew Stueber (RS Jr.), Trevor Keegan (So.), Jack Stewart (So.), Karsen Barnhart (So.) SDE: Aidan Hutchinson (Jr.), Julius Welschof (RS So.), Michael Morris (So.), David Ojabo (So.), Aaron Lewis Jr. (Fr.)DT: Michael Dwumfour (RS Sr.), Chris Hinton (So.), Ben Mason (Sr.), Carl Myers (RS Sr.)NT: Donovan Jeter (RS Jr.), Mazi Smith (So.), Phillip Paea (RS Jr.)WDE: Kwity Paye (Sr.), Luiji Vilain (RS Jr.), Gabe Newburg (So.), Braiden McGregor (Fr.)Viper/SAM: Michael Barrett (RS So.), Joey Velazquez (So.), Quinten Johnson (So.), William Mohan (Fr.)MIKE: Josh Ross (Sr.), Jordan Anthony (RS Jr.), Charles Thomas (So.), Osman Savage (Fr.)WILL: Cameron McGrone (Jr.), Cornell Wheeler (Fr.), Nikhai Hill-Green (Fr.)CB: Vincent Gray (RS So.), Jalen Perry (So.), Andre Seldon (Fr.)CB: Ambry Thomas (Sr.), Jaylen Kelly-Powell (Sr.), Gemon Green (RS So.), D.J. Turner II (So.)FS: J’Marick Woods (Sr.), Brad Hawkins (Sr.), German Green (RS So.)SS: Daxton Hill (So.), Sammy Faustin (RS So.), Jordan Morant (Fr.)center_img This is more of an exercise in looking at the 2020 roster than it is an actual depth chart, but here you can see what kind of talent is slated to be on the roster a year from now. Michigan has obviously been recruiting better under Jim Harbaugh than they were under Rich Rodriguez and Brady Hoke, but I look at this roster as being very deep with talent, more so than any other roster in recent memory. Jalen Mayfield (image via Detroit Free Press)last_img read more

Mayo Clinic researchers find genetic mutations that increase persons risk for pancreatic

first_imgJun 19 2018Six genes contain mutations that may be passed down in families, substantially increasing a person’s risk for pancreatic cancer. That’s according to Mayo Clinic research published in the June 19 edition of the JAMA. However, because researchers found these genetic mutations in patients with no family history of pancreatic cancer, they are recommending genetic testing for all pancreatic cancer patients as the new standard of care.Currently, health care providers offer genetic testing only to pancreatic cancer patients with a family history of the disease. That accounts for just 10 percent of all pancreatic cancer cases. Research suggests these testing guidelines miss genetic predisposition to cancer in up to 90 percent of pancreatic cancer patients with no family history. This finding is significant in part because the data suggest that family members should have DNA testing to understand their risk for cancer.”This study provides the most comprehensive data to date supporting genetic testing for all pancreatic cancer patients,” say Fergus Couch, Ph.D., a senior author on the study. “This is the first study to provide estimates on the magnitude of cancer risk associated with each gene. It indicates that family history alone cannot predict who has these mutations.””Multiple genes can each increase risk of pancreatic cancer. But if genetic testing is performed only on patients with a family history of pancreatic cancer, then a small number of patients will be helped,” says Gloria Petersen, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic researcher and senior author.Genetic testing was conducted on 3,030 pancreatic patients who were seen at Mayo Clinic between 2000 and 2016. The test results of 21 cancer genes were compared to similar results from more than 123,000 patients without pancreatic cancer. The study found six genes clearly linked to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer: BRCA1, BRCA2, CDKN2A, TP53, MLH1 and ATM. These genetic mutations were identified in 5.5 percent of all pancreatic cancer patients, including 5.2 percent of cancer patients without a family history of pancreatic cancer.Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerPatients who have these genetic mutations are at a substantially higher risk for pancreatic cancer, but that does not definitively mean they will develop the disease.”The conclusion of this study is that we now have better molecular insights into the underlying genetic causes of pancreatic cancer,” says Raed Samara, Ph.D., a study author from QIAGEN Sciences Inc. “The comprehensive data generated from this cohort required the specific and uniform sequencing, and deep analyses of a focused set of cancer predisposition genes. The risks of developing pancreatic cancer due to mutations in these genes can be more accurately estimated than ever before because of this seminal study.” Qiagen Sciences Inc. designed the DNA testing for this researchOften, pancreatic cancer is not diagnosed until late stages, when it has spread to other parts of the body. This year, 55,000 Americans will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, and 44,000 American will die of the disease this year, according to American Cancer Society estimates.Further clinical trials will be needed by other researchers to replicate the findings.​ Source:https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/mayo-clinic-discovers-gene-mutations-linked-to-pancreatic-cancer-calls-for-expanded-testing/last_img read more

Sleep duration of more than eight hours linked with greater mortality and

first_imgAug 7 2018A large study led by Keele University has found that sleeping longer than eight hours is more harmful than sleeping less than seven hours. The study also found that a sleep duration of ten hours is linked with 30% increased risk of dying compared to sleeping for seven hours.A global study led by Keele University has found that people who sleep for more than eight hours a night have a greater mortality and cardiovascular risk than those who sleep for under seven hours.The study also found that a sleep duration of ten hours is linked with 30% increased risk of dying compared to sleeping for seven hours.The study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, examined the link between self-reported sleep and cardiovascular disease and mortality in more than three million participants. The research found that a sleep duration of ten hours is further linked to a 56% increased risk of stroke mortality and a 49% increased risk of cardiovascular disease mortality.The researchers from Keele University, along with colleagues at the University of Manchester, the University of Leeds and the University of East Anglia, reviewed 74 studies looking at mortality and cardiovascular outcomes by self reported sleep duration and sleep quality.The study also found that poor sleep quality was associated with a 44% increase in coronary heart disease.Lead researcher Dr Chun Shing Kwok, working with Professor Mamas Mamas at Keele University’s Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, explains: “Our study has an important public health impact in that it shows that excessive sleep is a marker of elevated cardiovascular risk.”Our findings have important implications as clinicians should have greater consideration for exploring sleep duration and quality during consultations. If excessive sleep patterns are found, particularly prolonged durations of eight hours or more, then clinicians should consider screening for adverse cardiovascular risk factors and obstructive sleep apnea, which is a serious sleep disorder that occurs when a person’s breathing is interrupted during sleep.”Related StoriesNovel bed system with VR brainwave-control for sleep blissPink noise enhances deep sleep for people with mild cognitive impairmentSleep quality could be indicator for later Alzheimer’s disease finds studyThe analysis suggests that excessive sleep patterns are a marker of increased cardiovascular risk. The results show that sleeping for longer than the recommended duration of seven or eight hours may be associated with a moderate degree of harm, compared to those who sleep for shorter durations..Dr Kwok added: “The important message is that abnormal sleep is a marker of elevated cardiovascular risk and greater consideration should be given in exploring both duration and sleep quality during patient consultations.”Sleep affects everyone. The amount and quality of our sleep is complex. There are cultural, social, psychological, behavioral, pathophysiological and environmental influences on our sleep such as the need to care for children or family members, irregular working shift patterns, physical or mental illness, and the 24-hour availability of commodities in modern society.”This research began because we were interested to know if it was more harmful to sleep below or beyond the recommended sleep duration of seven to eight hours. We further wanted to know how incremental deviation from recommended sleep duration altered risk of mortality and cardiovascular risk.” Source:https://www.keele.ac.uklast_img read more

Scientists Fix Errors in Controversial Paper About Saturated Fats

In the new study, a meta-analysis, scientists from Europe and the United States pooled 72 individual studies to gauge how different fats influence the risk of a heart attack or other cardiac events, such as angina. These included trials in which participants were randomly assigned to different diets, as well as observational studies in which participants’ intake of fatty acids was determined by asking them about their diet or by measuring the fatty acids circulating in the bloodstream.When the researchers compared people with the highest and the lowest intake of saturated fats, they found no clear difference between the risk of heart disease or other cardiac events. Similarly, they found no significant difference between those consuming high or low amounts of the supposedly healthy unsaturated fats. “Current evidence does not clearly support guidelines that encourage high consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids and low consumption of total saturated fats,” the authors concluded.But even before the paper was published, other scientists began pointing out errors, says first author Rajiv Chowdhury, an epidemiologist at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. For instance, the authors took one study on omega-3 fats, one type of unsaturated fats, to show a slightly negative effect while, in fact, it had shown a strong positive effect. The correction means that the meta-analysis now says people who report eating lots of this particular fat have significantly less heart disease; previously, it said there was no significant effect.Critics also pointed out two important studies on omega-6 fatty acids that the authors had missed. The errors “demonstrate shoddy research and make one wonder whether there are more that haven’t been detected,” writes Jim Mann, a researcher at the University of Otago, Dunedin, in New Zealand, writes in an e-mail. “If I had been the referee I would have recommended rejection.”Mann and others say the paper has other problems, too. For instance, it does not address what people who reduced their intake of saturated fats consumed instead. A 2009 review concluded that replacing saturated fats with carbohydrates had no benefit, while replacing them with polyunsaturated fats reduced the risk of heart disease. Several scientists say that should have been mentioned in the new paper.Chowdhury says the paper’s conclusions are valid, however, even after the corrections. Randomized clinical trials are the “hardest” kind of evidence, he says, and they don’t show a significant effect of saturated or unsaturated fats. But even one of the paper’s authors, Dariush Mozaffarian, of the Harvard School of Public Health, admits that he is not happy with the key conclusion that the evidence does not support a benefit from polyunsaturated fats. “Personally, I think the results suggest that fish and vegetable oils should be encouraged,” he says. But the paper was written by a group of authors, he points out. “And science isn’t a dictatorship.”Another study author, Emanuele Di Angelantonio of the University of Cambridge, says the main problem is that the paper was “wrongly interpreted by the media.” “We are not saying the guidelines are wrong and people can eat as much saturated fat as they want. We are saying that there is no strong support for the guidelines and we need more good trials.”Willett says correcting the paper isn’t enough. “It is good that they fixed it for the record, but it has caused massive confusion and the public hasn’t heard about the correction.” The paper should be withdrawn, he argues.The controversy should serve as a warning about meta-analyses, Willett adds. Such studies compile the data from many individual studies to get a clearer result. “It looks like a sweeping summary of all the data, so it gets a lot of attention,” Willett says. “But these days meta-analyses are often done by people who are not familiar with a field, who don’t have the primary data or don’t make the effort to get it.” And while drug trials are often very similar in design, making it easy to combine their results, nutritional studies vary widely in the way they are set up. “Often the strengths and weaknesses of individual studies get lost,” Willett says. “It’s dangerous.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email When a paper published on 17 March questioned whether fats from fish or vegetable oils are healthier than those in meat or butter, it quickly made headlines around the world; after all, the study seemed to debunk a cornerstone of many dietary guidelines. But a new version of the publication had to be posted shortly after it appeared on the website of the Annals of Internal Medicine to correct several errors. And although the study’s first author stands by the conclusions, a number of scientists are criticizing the paper and even calling on the authors to retract it.”They have done a huge amount of damage,” says Walter Willett, chair of the nutrition department at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. “I think a retraction with similar press promotion should be considered.”Health officials have long argued that so-called saturated fatty acids, which are found in butter, meat, chocolate, and cheese, increase the risk of heart disease, and that people should instead eat more unsaturated fatty acids, the type that dominates in fish, nuts, or vegetable oils. 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Feature Revealing the hidden dangers of dietary supplements

first_imgSince 2005, when he found his patients were being sickened by a Brazilian weight loss supplement containing anti-depressants and thyroid hormones, Cohen has become something of a mix of Indiana Jones and Sherlock Holmes in the supplement world. With chemist colleagues in the United States, Brazil, and Europe, he hunts for drugs illegally buried in supplements. Then he goes public. His unorthodox public relations strategy is to publish research fast in low-profile, specialty journals, reach out to a network of hand-picked journalists, and, he hopes, ultimately inspire new regulations. He has virtually no funding, nor does he aspire to secure any. “I have total freedom,” he says. So far, he and his collaborators have identified three hidden stimulant drugs in supplements.Cohen’s discoveries highlight a broader problem, he and others contend: a dys-functional system for policing dietary supplements. “It comes to this,” says Paul Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, who published a book called Do You Believe in Magic? about alternative medicine. “Essentially a private citizen [is] doing the testing to make sure what’s on the label is in the bottle. … It’s absurd.”But that private citizen is having an impact. FDA actions have cited Cohen’s work or followed his publications, as the DMBA warnings did. He has also caught the attention of supplement companies, including in a lawsuit filed against him in April seeking $200 million in damages. “Everything I write gets such scrutiny” that it creates tremendous pressure, he says. “I want our science to 
be bulletproof.”THE MODERN SUPPLEMENT ERA began in 1994, when Congress passed the Dietary Supplement and Health Education Act, or DSHEA (pronounced duh-shay-uh). In the decades before, the supplements industry was overwhelmingly focused on vitamins and minerals. Much of the regulation centered on recommended daily allowances of products like vitamin C, iron, or calcium. DSHEA established the first broad framework for regulating supplements. It also gave supplements a legal definition: as substances intended to “supplement the diet,” containing “dietary ingredients” such as herbs, botanicals, or vitamins.At the same time, the law sharply curtailed FDA’s power. Companies were not required to notify FDA provided the dietary ingredient had a history of use before the law was passed. For the first time, DSHEA allowed them to make claims on the label suggesting supplements affected the structure or function of the body—for example, by boosting the immune system or protecting prostate health. And DSHEA codified a loose arrangement:  Under the law, as FDA notes on its website, “unlike drug products that must be proven safe and effective for their intended use before marketing, there are no provisions in the law for FDA to ‘approve’ dietary supplements … before they reach the consumer.” The agency can act only after a supplement is on the market and evidence shows it’s unsafe.Whereas the industry and many consumers celebrated DSHEA for expanding access to supplements, the act was skewered by physicians, journalists, and consumer protection groups. In an editorial shortly before DSHEA passed, The New York Times called it the “snake oil protection act,” suggesting that it was “about the right of unscrupulous companies and individuals to maximize profits by making fraudulent claims.” Meanwhile, the industry grew exponentially: Since 1994, the number of dietary supplements marketed in the United States has swelled from about 4000 to more than 75,000. About $36 billion worth were sold last year.The ink had barely dried on DSHEA when trouble began. Within 2 years, a Chinese herb called ma huang or ephedra, which companies promoted as a legal alternative to ecstasy, was under scrutiny. Although a natural product, the herb contains the chemical ephedrine, which stimulates the nervous system and constricts blood vessels. By early 1996, it had been linked to at least 15 deaths. Meanwhile, FDA was regularly issuing warnings about liver, kidney, and other health risks tied to supplements.“There are authentic dietary supplements—multivitamins, calcium, iron—which do supplement the diet” and can help many people, says rheumatologist and immuno-logist Donald Marcus of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, an early critic of the supplement industry. But other supplements, like “St. John’s wort, echinacea … are used as medicine,” he points out. In part because “botanicals are complex mixtures of chemicals,” supplements in this category present “a serious and growing public health problem,” Marcus and a colleague, pharmacologist Arthur Grollman of the State University of New York at Stony Brook, wrote in The New England Journal of Medicine in 2002. Just how big a problem was unclear, however, because FDA hears about only a tiny fraction of adverse events from the companies, they noted.Meanwhile, concerns about ephedra continued to mount. Army commissaries stopped selling it after it was implicated in the deaths of soldiers; after a 16-year-old taking the supplement died in Illinois, that state halted ephedra sales, too. FDA banned ephedra in 2004, after a 23-year-old Major League Baseball pitcher collapsed and died during practice and was found to be taking the herb. FDA CDC; Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics; CDC; NIH Email Mark Savage/Corbis Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe “I’m like, ‘I’m sorry, this person needs to sleep,’” she told the hospital staff. So Cohen had his mother smuggle in the laptop, along with data sets concealed inside The Boston Globe. “I could work on the manuscript when Lauren wasn’t looking,” he reasoned.Eleven days after the accident, and after the fourth of what would be five surgeries, Cohen and two collaborators submitted their paper to Drug Testing and Analysis. The report was unnerving: At least a dozen supplements sold in the United States for weight loss, enhanced brain function, and improved athletic performance contained a synthetic stimulant. The compound, which Cohen and his co-authors named DMBA, resembled in its chemical structure a stimulant called dimethylamylamine or DMAA. It had never been tested in people, only in two animal studies from the 1940s. “Its efficacy and safety are entirely unknown,” they wrote.By now ensconced in a hospital bed in his living room and waiting for skin grafts to heal, Cohen appealed to the journal: “I can’t walk, I’m totally available. Can you guys crank this review?” The paper was published online a month later, last October. In April of this year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued warning letters to 14 companies selling products containing DMBA. “The FDA considers these dietary supplements to be adulterated,” it wrote. And boom, Cohen was on to his next project. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Pieter Cohen’s brush with death came at a most inconvenient time: just as he was about to nail another menacing ingredient in a dietary supplement.Hiking last August in New Hampshire with his wife and three children, Cohen, an internist at Cambridge Health Alliance in Massachusetts, stumbled and fell. A rock punctured his left calf. “It was a little cut, but deep,” recalls his wife, Lauren Budding. By the next day, bacteria were coursing through Cohen’s bloodstream. The leg turned red and swelled. His blood pressure dropped precipitously. Cohen was rushed to a community hospital and soon after by ambulance to a trauma unit in Boston.Doctors worked feverishly to stabilize him and stop the spread of infection. Over the next few days, the threat of death ebbed, though the risk that he would never walk normally remained. Cohen, meanwhile, fretted about the same matters he usually did: consumers, including his patients, who might be swallowing dietary supplements spiked with drugs. Bedbound and in searing pain, he asked for his computer. His wife refused. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Cohen’s initiation into supplements came on the job. After finishing at the Yale School of Medicine, he began his residency and then went to work at Cambridge Health Alliance, a network of neighborhood clinics and community hospitals. Many of Cohen’s patients were Brazilian immigrants who had settled nearby.Before long, the clinic’s patients developed mysterious symptoms. One woman came in “with palpitations, sweating, anxiety, but also feeling very tired,” remembers Daniel McCormick, a primary care internist in the same practice, who mentored Cohen in residency and shares a small office with him. Another wound up in the emergency room with kidney failure. One man lost his job after his urine tested positive for amphetamines.Cohen made the connection: The patients were all taking weight loss pills known as rainbow diet pills, imported in bulk from Brazil. He sent the capsules off to a private lab for testing. The results shocked the doctors. The tests revealed amphetamines, thyroid hormones, diuretics, benzodiazepines, and antidepressants such as fluoxetine. “It was a pharmacopeia in one pill,” McCormick says. “It became clear to a lot of us that you could explain the symptoms from the diet pills.”McCormick, Cohen, and three other colleagues conducted a survey of 307 Brazilian patients in their clinic and two nearby churches. They found that 18% in the clinic and 9% in the churches reported taking the pills, and two-thirds reported side effects. The paper was published online in 2007 in the obscure Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health.“Less than 10 people are going to read that,” Cohen admitted to himself, because the journal is so specialized. “I knew that if I wanted more … I needed to do some outreach.” He contacted a local NPR reporter who had recently run a story on Latino bodegas selling antibiotics without a prescription, thinking he might be interested. The reporter invited him in for a studio interview. Folha de S.Paulo, a major Brazilian newspaper, contacted Cohen and ran a front-page story. Several years later, rainbow diet pills were banned in Brazil, though Cohen doesn’t know whether his work had anything to do with that.Cohen thought the spiked supplements were an anomaly confined to the Brazilian neighborhoods. But then he got a call from an official in the drug division at FDA. “What you found in those diet pills shipped up from Brazil,” the official told him, “actually are found in weight loss supplements in the United States, and it’s a major problem.”“WE HAVE BEEN WORRIED about contaminated dietary supplements for ages,” says Amy Eichner of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency in Colorado Springs, Colorado. In 2003 and 2008, two elite swimmers lost the chance to compete in the Olympics after testing positive for performance-enhancing drugs they said they didn’t know were in their supplements. A similar fate befell two top cyclists. “That’s our nightmare scenario,” Eichner says.Another with longstanding concerns is Patricia Deuster at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland, who estimates that between 15% and 20% of military members are swallowing the supplements she and others fret about most: products marketed for bodybuilding, weight loss, and athletic performance. Another worrying category includes sexual enhancement products.So in 2013, she and Eichner began 
systematically parsing supplement ingredients. Preliminary results, still unpublished, show that of the 169 high-risk products tested so far, 107 “contained at least one substance prohibited in sports,” Eichner says, and often that substance wasn’t listed clearly on the label. In many cases, she says, the ingredients are “either Schedule III substances on the Controlled Substances Act—that’s pretty major—or they have been specifically declared illegal by the FDA.”At around that time, Cohen had an electrifying phone conversation. A lab scientist who tests supplements for companies confided in Cohen that he was deeply disturbed by the prevalence of an ephedra substitute, DMAA, which kept appearing in products despite mounting concerns about its safety. That conversation was “the catalyst that opened this whole new world to me,” Cohen says.With rainbow diet pills, he’d been focused on prescription drugs. Although DMAA had appeared in nasal sprays many decades ago before being removed from the market, it was now more like a “research chemical,” Cohen says, which some companies argued came from plants but which Cohen and many others disputed. He began searching for dangerous additives in supplements. FDA declared supplements containing DMAA illegal soon after, in 2013, but as Cohen quickly learned, there was no shortage of other targets.“It’s a Sherlock Holmes situation,” he says with relish. “There’s a crime scene, there’s hints of struggle, people are dying after taking supplements. … What is actually going on?”He found a perfect partner more than 5000 kilometers away near Utrecht, the Netherlands: Bastiaan Venhuis, a medicinal chemist who was also analyzing supplement ingredients. One of their first joint publications, in collaboration with NSF International, which tests food, supplements, and other consumer products, appeared online in the fall of 2013 in Drug Testing and Analysis. It examined a popular workout supplement called Craze. When Venhuis diluted the powder and ran it through his analyzer, telltale peaks indicated DEPEA, a methamphetamine analog.To garner publicity, Cohen expanded the strategy he had followed with the Brazilian supplements. He sought a final manuscript from the journal about a week in advance and sent personal emails to upward of three dozen journalists, carefully selected for their prior coverage or relationships he had nurtured with them.Cohen’s office buddy McCormick acknowledges that such media outreach, which he’s done himself, can feel awkward. It’s often regarded “as self-promotional,” McCormick says. “In the beginning I felt that way intensely and it was very uncomfortable. But … the vast number of hours that go into thinking about a research project, writing it, is just wasted” if it stops there, especially when it might have an impact on health policy.Cohen has caught the attention not only of myriad journalists but of the supplement industry, too. In late April, a company called Hi-Tech Pharmaceuticals filed a $200 million claim for damages against Cohen and two colleagues, after the researchers published a paper suggesting Hi-Tech and other companies were marketing supplements that contained an amphetaminelike stimulant, BMPEA, which they mislabeled as Acacia rigidula, a shrub that grows in Texas and south into Mexico.The company vigorously disputes that 
BMPEA is not part of the plant. “A real scientist concerned with objectivity would have taken steps to ensure that they weren’t disparaging products before they did this to the public,” says Edmund Novotny, an attorney in Atlanta who represents Hi-Tech.Cohen wasn’t alone in singling out 
BMPEA: His study came about 18 months after FDA scientists reported detecting BMPEA in supplements, too, noting that nowhere could they find evidence that BMPEA was a natural component of plants. Soon after Cohen’s publication, FDA sent warning letters to five companies selling BMPEA-laced supplements, including Hi-Tech.Like others, Cohen agrees that FDA’s supplement policing powers are too limited. But that doesn’t mean the agency has no muscle. “There’s so many things FDA could be doing that they’re not doing,” he says—for example, removing supplements from store shelves when companies don’t fully pass FDA inspections. The agency, Cohen believes, is overwhelmed by the sheer volume of supplements and discouraged by political forces from acting aggressively. When it comes to pulling a supplement ingredient, FDA’s attitude is “show us the dead bodies,” he says. Top swimmer Jessica Hardy tested positive for a banned substance she said she didn’t know was in a supplement she was taking, “That’s our nightmare scenario,” says a U.S. antidoping official. FDA officials wouldn’t put it that way, but they don’t entirely disagree. “Under current law, the FDA faces a high burden before it can take enforcement action on a dietary supplement,” wrote spokeswoman 
Lyndsay Meyer in an email message. The agency has its own frustrations. “The supply chain … is extremely fragmented,” Meyer wrote. “The individuals and businesses selling these products may operate out of residential homes, and distribute via internet, small stores, and mail … We recognize that more can and should be done.”Nearly a year after his harrowing ordeal while hiking, Cohen has regained full function of his leg, though he still wears a black compression stocking. Sitting in his office in June, surrounded by photos of his three children and a jumble of supplement bottles patients have handed over to him for testing, Cohen shows little of the fatalism of others who have battled supplements for years. The reform movement “definitely has momentum,” he says. “I think we’re going to look back 50 years from now, and say ‘How could supplements have been regulated like this?’” In anticipation of that day, Cohen is working now to nail two more drugs that show up in supplements. He’s also been studying yohimbine, a prescription drug that can be extracted from the bark of a species of West African evergreen tree and sometimes appears in bodybuilding capsules. Like ephedrine, yohimbine “comes from a plant but is pharmaceutically active,” he says, blurring the line between drug and supplement.His dream is an informed populace, with companies required to fork over the recipes and the risks of their products. “Whenever possible, we should have the freedom of being able to purchase whatever we want to put in our body,” Cohen says. “People should be able to purchase echinacea. It’s just, when they purchase echinacea, they should know what they’re getting.”*Correction, 3 September, 11:37 a.m.: This article has been corrected to reflect that DMBA’s structure resembles that of a stimulant called DMAA, not methamphetamine.last_img read more

How teeth got tough enamels evolutionary journey

first_img Email The hardest bit of your body is the enamel coating your teeth. But new analyses of fish fossils, as well as genetic analyses of a living fish species, suggest that this specialized material once served a very different function: to toughen some bones and scales of ancient fish. The findings bolster earlier suggestions that ancient fish had enamel-armored scales, and they point to a new scenario for exactly how the substance ended up on teeth.Enamel—an almost pure layer of a 
mineral called hydroxyapatite—coats the teeth of almost all tetrapods (four-limbed creatures) and lobe-finned fish such as 
coelacanths. Most living fish do not produce it, but Per Ahlberg, a paleontologist at Uppsala University in Sweden, found an ancient exception. Well-preserved fossils of an ancient fish called Psaro-lepis romeri reveal that this 20-centimeter-long minipredator, which prowled the seas between 410 million and 415 million years ago, had enamel in its scales and its skull—but not its teeth, according to a paper by Ahlberg and colleagues in the 24 September issue of Nature.Other teams had found partial fossils of fish with enamel on their scales. But those fragments might not have 
belonged to the same individual, Ahlberg says, so researchers couldn’t be  sure just how the enameled bits were distributed across the body, or if they came from 
individuals at different ages or developmental stages. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Ahlberg’s team instead looked at a single specimen of Psarolepis, slicing through the jawbone, skull bones, and scales to get a microscopic peek at their internal structure and so identify what they were made of. The teeth were naked dentine, the same material that underlies the enamel in your teeth and those of most modern tetrapods. But the scales and skull bones of this ancient fish included some enamel.Researchers had suggested that over millions of years of evolution, hardened structures such as external scales gradually migrated into the mouth and changed shape to become teeth. But the patchy distribution of enamel in Psarolepis may suggest a different scenario, in which the pattern of enamel production, rather than the of shape and location of already enameled structures, shifted over time.The team also analyzed the genome of the spotted gar 
(Lepisosteus oculatus), a modern-day species that produces a hard enamel-like material called ganoine that covers its scales. The genome shows that gar can produce two of the three proteins needed to make enamel, and suggests that ganoine is essentially a scale-coating version of enamel. Thus, it offers genetic support for the fossil evidence.These findings “are very interesting,” says Zerina Johanson, a paleobiologist at the Natural History Museum in London. In contrast to previous ideas, the work suggests that hardened structures such as scales may not have physically moved from one place in the body to another as species evolved. Instead, evolution may have shifted the activity of enamelmaking proteins to new body parts.“This may provide a better understanding of what was going on inside primitive vertebrates,” she says.last_img read more

Neandertals and early modern humans probably didnt meet at rumored rendezvous site

first_img Croatia’s scenic Vindija Cave was thought to be a potential trysting site for Neandertals and early modern humans some 32,000 years ago. Now, a new study questions that idea, using a more exacting form of radiocarbon dating to suggest instead that Neandertals used the cave 40,000 years ago—some 8000 years before modern humans lived in that part of Europe. If true, the find casts doubt on the long-held assumption by some that the two hominids overlapped in the region.“Many of us have long suspected [this],” writes Erik Trinkaus, a biological anthropologist at Washington University in St. Louis who wasn’t involved in the work, in an email. He points out that the dating of sites across Europe have generally put the Neandertal’s demise there about 40,000 years ago. “This article puts to rest an anomalous occurrence of late Neandertals in this region, and allows us to move on from it.”In the late 1990s, researchers dated the Neandertal remains from the cave, which included fragments of skulls, thighs, and other assorted bones, using radiocarbon dating, which measures an isotope known as carbon-14 that decays over time at a fixed rate. By seeing how much carbon-14 is left, scientists can get a roughly accurate idea of when the Neandertal lived. Using the carbon-14 in bone collagen from skull fragments and other bones found inside the cave, the original studies returned an estimated age of 29,000 to 34,000 years old. That was about the same time that early modern humans moved into Europe—as evidenced by modern human remains and tools also found in the cave—raising the specter that the two groups met, competed, and even mated with one another. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe More precise radiocarbon dating suggests Neandertals and humans did not live near Croatia’s Vindija Cave at the same time. Ivor Karavanić Email Earlier this year, a team led by archaeologists Thibaut Devièse and Thomas Higham at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom turned to a more refined method of radiocarbon dating. Instead of measuring the carbon-14 in bone collagen—a gelatinous mixture that can easily be contaminated by sediment and microorganisms from the environment—the researchers zeroed in on a particular amino acid inside the collagen called hydroxyproline. By Michael PriceSep. 4, 2017 , 3:00 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Researchers dated a particular amino acid from four different Neandertal bone fragments found in Vindija Cave, including this newly identified (but uncategorized) bone discovered during the course of the study. Ian Cartwright (Institute of Archaeology, University of Oxford) Neandertals and early modern humans probably didn’t meet at rumored rendezvous site Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Dating the isolated hydroxyproline revealed that the remains were likely to be about 40,000 years old, the researchers report today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. That’s 8000 years older than previous research had suggested and before modern humans appear in the region.Archaeologist João Zilhão of the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom, who wasn’t involved in the study, said testing a specific amino acid is a good way to avoid contamination issues when radiocarbon dating a bone sample. But he adds that the technique will have to be replicated by other laboratories before he’s confident the results are reliable.Geoffrey Clark, an anthropologist at Arizona State University in Tempe, says the new technique is a big improvement over standard bone collagen dating, and he is looking forward to seeing it applied to previously dated Neandertal remains from other sites. “Whether they will get the same results isn’t known yet, but it looks promising,” he says.Shared genes between modern humans and Neandertals make it clear that at some time and place in the past, the two species did meet and interbreed—just not at Vindija Cave, Devièse says. “DNA studies have demonstrated that anatomically modern humans and Neandertals interbred,” he says. “There is no question about this … although the two groups for the most part were not living side-by-side, it would seem. With this dating work, we are continuing our work to understand where and for how long the two species coexisted.”last_img read more

Woman Pretended To Be A Doctor In Uganda

first_img Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family However, when their own children died it was revealed that Bach had no training in medicine and “that in 2015, the District Health Officer had closed her facility and ordered her to not offer any treatment to any child.” They accuse Bach and SHC of causing the deaths of “hundreds of children amounting to violations of human rights including violation of children’s right to access adequate treatment, the right to health of the children, the right to life, the right to be free from discrimination on the basis of race and social economic standing and the right to dignity, freedom from torture, inhuman and degrading treatment.”They are asking for the SHC to be closed and cease to operate in Uganda. They are also asking for “general damages be awarded to the aggrieved families complaining herein.”An article in September of 2018 from Medium describes a horrific Bach who learned medical procedures from watching YouTube. Bach was doing “high level medical practices” and openly talked about enjoying “hands on medical care.”It appears that Renee Bach is still in Uganda. The Independent reports in 2016 she relocated to a different are of Uganda “under the government-owned Kigandaalo Health Center IV.”One Twitter user reported she was supposed to be in court in March but the case was delayed until 2020. Africa , Renee Bach , Uganda A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ AllAfrica.com claims she took children with malnutrition from local hospitals and treated them at SHC and she is now being sued. Two women named Gimbo Zubeda and Kakai Rose alongside civil society organisation Women’s Probono Initiative said in a press release, “The mothers allege that they were led to believe that Ms. Renee Bach was a ‘medical doctor’ and that her home was a ‘medical facility’ as she was often seen wearing a white coat, a stethoscope and often administered medications to children in her care.” More By NewsOne Staff Jesse Jackson Demands ‘Justice Now’ At EJ Bradford’s Moving Funeral Ceremony Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice. SUBSCRIBE Emantic "EJ" Fitzgerald Braford Jr. Hopefully, Renee Bach will be held accountable for her actions. Our condolences go out to every parent who lost their child under her devilish care.SEE ALSO:All The Ways Cops Are Still Trying To Cover Up LaQuan McDonald’s ExecutionOutrageous! Figurines Of White Cherub Crushing Head Of Black Angel Removed From Dollar StoreMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s Clothes Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist I want to offer updates on #ReneeBach as my page is blowing up thanks to the link from @sugabelly. Renee had her day in court in Mayuge District, Uganda on March 12th. She didn’t appear but had her legal team snow @WomenProbono w/paperwork & got a delay until early 2020. pic.twitter.com/fAGNLDMv95— Nikki Gagnon (@PeaceAmaniPaix) June 12, 2019 Renee Bach is a U.S. missionary with no medical training who left Virginia in 2007 and went to Uganda. By 2012, she founded a private NGO and healthcare facility called Serving His Children. She allegedly led people to believe she was a doctor and 100 babies reportedly died around her fraudulent care.READ MORE: Candace Owens Reportedly ‘Influenced’ New Zealand Mosque Terroristalast_img read more

Drought is not just about water It affects air pollution too

first_img The severe drought that struck California from 2011 to 2015 had an obvious impact on rivers, forests, and wildlife. Now, a new study shows it also had some surprising effects on the state’s notorious air pollution, adding new wrinkles to the state’s efforts to clear the skies.Researchers have long known that plants can both help create and cleanse one dangerous air pollutant: ground-level ozone, which causes breathing problems and exacerbates lung damage. Plants can scrub ozone from the air by absorbing the pollutant through their stomata, or pores. But certain plants also emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that react with other atmospheric chemicals to create ozone.Understanding how drought influences these two processes can be tricky. Dry conditions could cause ozone levels to rise, because plants shrink their stomata to prevent water loss, reducing their ability to remove pollution. But drought might also reduce ozone levels, because the stress could cause plants to produce fewer ozone-forming VOCs. California’s lengthy drought, and the state’s extensive network of air pollution sensors, gave researchers a rare opportunity to see what happens in the real world. The team, led by atmospheric chemistry Ph.D. candidate Angelique Demetillo and environmental science professor Sally Pusede at the University of Virginia (UVA) in Charlottesville, examined more than a decade’s worth of satellite and sensor data that documented atmospheric conditions over Bakersfield and Fresno, two California cities that suffer from ozone pollution.The drought’s impact on air quality changed over time, the researchers report this week in Environmental Science & Technology. Plants did remove less ozone, with absorption dropping by about 15% during the most severe years of the drought. But during the early years of the drought, trees and other plants were able to maintain their production of one key ozone-forming VOC, isoprene. The chemical helps plants like oak trees withstand heat stress, and it appears the trees draw on carbon stores to sustain isoprene production. “It’s like a person exercising; when you’ve burned through your recent consumption the body switches over and starts burning fat,” says Manuel Lerdau, an organismal ecologist at UVA and a co-author of the study.After about 4 years of drought, however, the stress took its toll. In 2013, plant isoprene levels fell dramatically, by 65% in Bakersfield and 54% in Fresno. Overall, that meant up to a 20% dip in ozone pollution. And even after the drought ended, isoprene levels didn’t immediately rebound.The plant VOC reduction might sound like good news for reducing California’s smog. But the complexity of atmospheric chemistry means droughts could actually complicate clean air efforts. That’s because, currently, regulations mostly focus on controlling nitrogen oxides (NOx) from sources like cars and factories, which react with VOCs to form ozone. When VOC levels are higher, those NOx controls help choke off smog-creating reactions. But reduce the VOCs, and NOx limits go from “being very effective to less effective,” Pusede says.Such findings offer yet another complication for U.S. states and cities struggling to meet federal clean air standards, especially in drought-prone western states. Regulators have little ability to control VOC emissions from plants, notes Pusede, and “I don’t know if we’d want to even if we could.” But the study could help regulators do a better job of factoring drought into their air pollution models.The work also “provides a road map for better quantifying these impacts in other places,” says atmospheric scientist Jessica Neu of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, who reviewed the paper. And because much of the needed data can now be collected by satellites, she says it opens the door to investigating “drought impacts on air quality globally.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A lengthy California drought left trees and plants parched and influenced their contributions to smog. 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Country Email Drought is not just about water. It affects air pollution, too By Jason PlautzApr. 11, 2019 , 3:10 PMlast_img read more